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I have a class, 'Foo', which has a name (string) and a set of data (a list of integers). I need to be able to find 'test' any string/list combination against a list of Foo's, to find any matches. Like this:

class Foo:
    def __init__(self, name, data):
        self.name = str(name)
        self.data = list(data)


foo1 = Foo('abc', [1, 2, 3])
foo2 = Foo('def', [4, 5, 6])
foo3 = Foo('ghi', [7, 8, 9])

my_list = [foo1, foo2, foo3]

def test(name, data):
    results = []
    for foo in my_list:
        if foo.name == name:
            for number in data:
                if number in foo.data:
                    results.append(number)
    return name, results

print test('def', [2, 3, 4, 5])

will return

('def', [4, 5])

while...

print test('gah', [1, 2, 3])

will return

('gah', [])

This basically works, but it looks kind of silly. I was hoping there was a way to use list comprehension or generators to make it prettier. I'm not necessarilly looking to flatten everything to a single one-line expression, as I expect that would be next to impossible to read, but I suspect there's a better way of doing this.

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Can there be more than one foo with the same name? –  Mark Byers Nov 10 '11 at 21:02
1  
@JochenRitzel Unsued argument ? What do you mean ? –  eyquem Nov 11 '11 at 22:08
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3 Answers

It seems like you can restructure a number of things in your code to make it work a bit better.

First, instead of having data be a list, I'd consider a set. That would allow you to use data.intersection(otherdata) to get the overlap.

Next, instead of a list of Foo instances, perhaps a dictionary keyed by their names? That would let you index into it by your test name, rather than having to loop over the list of instances to find the appropriate one.

class Foo:
    def __init__(self, name, data):
        self.name = str(name)
        self.data = set(data)


foo1 = Foo('abc', [1, 2, 3])
foo2 = Foo('def', [4, 5, 6])
foo3 = Foo('ghi', [7, 8, 9])

my_lookup = dict((f.name, f) for f in [foo1, foo2, foo3])

def test(name, data):
    if name in my_lookup:
        return name, my_lookup[name].data.intersection(data)
    return name, []

I realized, if you tested for a name you didn't have, you'd get a KeyError, so I adjusted it to handle that appropriately.

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Really, this is the right way to do it. intersection can take any iterable, not just a set, so the second conversion is unnecessary -- it also means if you need Foo.data to be a list, you can still do set(data).intersection(my_lookup[name].data) in test. –  agf Nov 10 '11 at 23:26
    
you could make this shorter by writing if name in my_lookup: return name, my_lookup[name].data.intersection(data) -- that would make the return None superfluous. –  Jason Sundram Nov 11 '11 at 7:21
    
Actually, as I look at the question a bit closer, the OP indicated what would be returned if the test failed, so I went ahead and put that into the answer. –  g.d.d.c Nov 11 '11 at 18:15
    
@g.d.d.c Creating the dictionary my_lookup doesn't bring particuliar benefit, I find . Simon Lundberg has "to loop over the list of instances to find the appropriate one(s)" but you do the same to create this dictionary. Letting my_lookup outside the function makes also my_lookup a free identifier inside the function, which is not the best to do: to test other wanted data, another my_lookup will be necessary to be created, then the logic is to introduce it inside the function. But then creation of my_lookup inside will be very similar to the one in the code of Simon. –  eyquem Nov 11 '11 at 22:44
    
@agf "Really, this is the right way to do it." I don't think so. My answer speaks for me –  eyquem Nov 11 '11 at 22:44
show 4 more comments

You could use sets instead of lists:

from itertools import chain

def test(name, data):
    data = frozenset(data)
    return name, list(chain.from_iterable(data & set(foo.data)
                                          for foo in my_list
                                          if foo.name == name))

See it working online: ideone

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I find this complicated and above all the use of set has the consequence that the order is lost. –  eyquem Nov 11 '11 at 22:47
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This basically works, but it looks kind of silly.
Not silly, just inexperimented.

I was hoping there was a way to use list comprehension or generators to make it prettier. (...) I suspect there's a better way of doing this.
Absolutely, your intuition was good.

A simple way to improve:

class Foo:
    dicfoos = {}
    def __init__(self, name, data):
        self.name = str(name)
        self.data = list(data)
        self.__class__.dicfoos.setdefault(self.name,[]).append(self) 

foo1 = Foo('abc', [1, 2, 3])
foo2 = Foo('def', [4, 5, 6])
foo3 = Foo('ghi', [7, 8, 9])
foo4 = Foo('def', [10, 11, 12])

def test(klass,the_name, wanted_data):
    return (the_name,
            tuple( x for foo in klass.dicfoos.get(the_name,())
                   for x in foo.data if x in wanted_data ) )

print test(Foo,'zzz', [2, 3, 4, 5, 11])
print test(Foo,'def', [2, 3, 4, 5, 11])
print test(Foo,'abc', [2, 3, 4, 5, 11])

result

('zzz', ())
('def', (4, 5, 11))
('abc', (2, 3))

A little more sophisticated way of doing:

class Foo:
    dicfoos = {}
    def __init__(self, name, data):
        self.name = str(name)
        self.data = list(data)
        self.__class__.dicfoos.setdefault(self.name,[]).append(self)
    def sift(self,daataa):
        for n in self.data:
            if n in daataa:  yield n

foo1 = Foo('abc', [1, 2, 3])
foo2 = Foo('def', [4, 5, 6])
foo3 = Foo('ghi', [7, 8, 9])
foo4 = Foo('def', [10, 11, 12])


def test(klass,the_name,wanted_data):
    return (the_name,
            tuple( x for foo in klass.dicfoos.get(the_name,())
                   for x in foo.sift(wanted_data) ) )

print test(Foo,'zzz', [2, 3, 4, 5, 11])
print test(Foo,'def', [2, 3, 4, 5, 11])
print test(Foo,'abc', [2, 3, 4, 5, 11])

You can replace the name tuple with list if it is really necessary, but a tuple is a lighter data structure

Edit

Taking account of a remark of g.d.d.c in a comment I replaced a list lifoos with the dictionary dicfoos: this latter avoids a lookup when the instances of a precise name are needed, the itel with this precise name gives the list of such instances

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Thanks, everyone. I have restructured my code and it's working much better now. The whole thing is a bit of a cludge, but at the moment that's mostly because I'm working against a piece of software whose Python integration is basically just the ability to send commands via strings. Much obliged! –  Simon Lundberg Nov 21 '11 at 21:36
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