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I am writting some conditionall if and I want to have something like

if ( /*condition one */) and or ( /* condition two */   )

Is there such operator in C++ and how to write it?

So I want something like

if((( /* condition A */)&&(/* condition B */ ))|| /* AND OR? */ ((  /* condition C */ )&&(  /* condition D */)))

(for figuring out if at least one side of a segment belongs to another segment)

So... there is on "AND OR" IN c++ AND WE SHALL ALWAYS WRITE UGLY CODE DUPLICATION LIKE THIS:

if(((( /* condition A */)&&(/* condition B */ ))|| ((   /* condition C */ )&&(  /* condition D */))) || ((( /* condition A */)&&(/* condition B */ )) && (( /* condition C */ )&&(  /* condition D */))) 

?

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13  
What do you mean by "AND OR"? Could you write a truth table? –  dan04 Nov 10 '11 at 21:05
2  
AND and OR are mutually exclusive operators. Pick one. –  Matt Ball Nov 10 '11 at 21:06
2  
They're mutually exclusive... how could you have both? –  w00te Nov 10 '11 at 21:06
2  
Question is unclear. What are you trying to accomplish with "and or"? Can you give us an example? –  JoeFish Nov 10 '11 at 21:08
3  
I really don't understand all the down-votes (8 in 4 minutes? it's not a competition!). I believe that there is a "good question" here and the complication is merely an artifact of trying to describe something in English. On the other hand, this other question is worthy of down-votes, sheeple with caution :-) –  user166390 Nov 10 '11 at 21:09

5 Answers 5

up vote 23 down vote accepted

If you mean what I think you mean, then in English it is more commonly written and/or, and what it means is this:

  • if A is true and B is false OR
  • if A is false and B is true OR
  • if A is true and B is true

then the expression is as a whole is true.

If that is what you mean, then the answer is simply or or ||.

The first two cases are typically referred to in programming as an exclusive or, or XOR: that is, if one is true, and the other is not.

The C++ or operator is an inclusive OR, that is, it is true if one or both of the operands are true

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If you have two conditions, A and B

A | B | A and B | A or B
------------------------
T   T      T        T
T   F      F        T
F   T      F        T
F   F      F        F

If A or B is true, A and B is true as well. Sounds like you just want OR.

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and or would simply be or in boolean terms: you can use the double pipe (||) operator for that.

if ( /*condition one */) || ( /* condition two */   )
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1  
That's OR. Where's the AND? –  Matt Ball Nov 10 '11 at 21:06
    
I thought this means only OR... So generally I want to create something like if((( it->second.first >= start_x)&&(start_x <= it->second.second))|| /* AND OR */ (( it->second.first >= x-1)&&( x-1 <= it->second.second))) –  Rella Nov 10 '11 at 21:06
4  
@user it does mean only OR. Read the comments on your question. –  Matt Ball Nov 10 '11 at 21:07
    
@user1040114: You must be thinking of "exclusive or", which means one or the other but not both. –  Fred Larson Nov 10 '11 at 21:07

Just use or. It will evaluate to true if even if both conditions are true.

In other words, the "or" operation is inclusive or, not exclusive or. The latter requires that exactly one of the two conditions be true.

We usually use the || operator, but or also works:

if (/* condition one */ || /* condition two */)
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And takes input with the following output

true, true -> true
true, false -> false
false, true -> false
false, false -> false

Or takes the input with the following output

true, true -> true
true, false -> true
false, true -> true
false, false -> false

So if "and or" means that it could be "and" and it could be "or", using a single "or" handles both scenarios if your are only verifying "true" output, as true, true -> true (and's only true output) is already contained in the standard or output.

If "and or" means that it must be "and" and it must also be "or" using a single "and" handles both scenarios if you are only verifying "true" output, as true, true -> true (and's only true output) is already contained in the standard or output.

If you are verifying only "false" output, the precedence of which operator to select is inverted depending on the interpretation of the combination.

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