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I'll try and make this question as brief as possible. I was wondering if there is a way to do the following via PHP & MySQL coding:

  1. Delete an auto-incremented id entry (say entry 12 of 20), and at the same time lower the rest of the entries by 1. (Example: Delete entry 12 == Entry 13 becomes 12, 14 becomes 13, etc. etc.)

  2. Manually (i.e via form) insert an entry with an ID so that the rest are pushed up if specified by the user (and defaults to normal behaviour if nothing is specified. (Example: User specifies that he wants his entry to be ID 14, but there is already an ID 14 in the database. What should happen would be that the user input pushes the already existing entry up to 15, & the rest of the existing entries follow a similar fashion. If the user does not specify an ID, default to normal behaviour.)

I'm still learning MySQL & PHP and the code I need is for an image gallery system that I've been building for a while now.

Is it at all possible?

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3  
You usually don't want to do this with your primary key for reasons of referential integrity. Are you sure the user needs to be able to edit the IDs in the first place? Why? Is it for cosmetic reasons? –  Pekka 웃 Nov 10 '11 at 21:36
    
It's supposed to be a kind of panic button if something corrupts or goes wrong with already existing entries that isn't repairable with the UPDATE command. My girlfriend will be doing most of the content submission on the site, but sometimes I'm not around to fix these errors & she's not code savvy. I'm trying to make an average Joe's panic fix-thing. If you get what I mean? –  Martin Nov 10 '11 at 21:45
    
Is there a reason why the IDs need to be consecutive? E.g., if record 12 gets deleted, will something break if there's a "hole" between 11 and 13? –  todofixthis Nov 11 '11 at 20:33
    
Yeah; I pull a list of all entries there and arrange them by ID. Since it's part of a comic management system, I also use the incrementing ID to show the number of the page. So if record 12 gets deleted, there'll be a jump from page 11 to page 13 that'll be pretty hard to fix. The reason I'm doing it like that is to try and save some code and keep it as clean as possible. –  Martin Nov 12 '11 at 15:18

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

For task 1, you would need to manually set the AUTO_INCREMENT value for that table after modifying all of the IDs so there's no gap when the next insert happens. A far better way is to not use an auto-increment ID at all - have an ID column, and use MAX(id)+1 to find the required ID at the time of record insertion.

here's my psuedocode:

for a deletion:

$n = 12;
DELETE from items where id='$n';
UPDATE items SET id=id-1 WHERE id > '$n'

for a specified insertion:

$n = 15;
(if there is a record with id = 15)
   UPDATE items SET id=id+1 WHERE id >= '$n'
INSERT into items (id,..) values ('$n',...)

for an unspecified insertion

$n = SELECT MAX(id)+1 FROM items
INSERT into items (id,..) values ('$n',...)
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I think this would be the best solution, though it'll require a bit of a code rewrite on my end. I'll get to work on it tomorrow. Thank you very much <3 –  Martin Nov 10 '11 at 22:04

That is really not an efficient way to use auto-increment columns (databases are not designed to do that). You'd wind up doing effectively a table scan any time you inserted or removed an item.

If you want to have an ordering that you can insert at will, it'd be better to maintain a separate mapping (e.g. have a separate entry that stores a list of IDs that you can manipulate at will).

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It's not really intended to be the primary way of handling it, more of an emergency thing. I think what I said to Pekka best explains it: "It's supposed to be a kind of panic button if something corrupts or goes wrong with already existing entries that isn't repairable with the UPDATE command. My girlfriend will be doing most of the content submission on the site, but sometimes I'm not around to fix these errors & she's not code savvy. I'm trying to make an average Joe's panic fix-thing. If you get what I mean?" –  Martin Nov 10 '11 at 21:47

For #1 try this SQL commands:

DELETE FROM table WHERE id=12;
UPDATE table set id=id-1 WHERE id > 12;
ALTER TABLE table AUTO_INCREMENT=AUTO_INCREMENT-1;

But it is a bad idea to use ID field like this. You shouldn't modify it's value after row was inserted into table.

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You can use this for your 1) question. Run the whole block together. @id should be set to the row you want to delete.

SET @id = 12;
DELETE FROM tbl WHERE id = @id;
UPDATE  tbl set id = id-1 WHERE id > @id;
ALTER TABLE tbl AUTO_INCREMENT = 0;

MySQL disclaimer: You cannot reset the counter to a value less than or equal to any that have already been used. For MyISAM, if the value is less than or equal to the maximum value currently in the AUTO_INCREMENT column, the value is reset to the current maximum plus one. For InnoDB, you can use ALTER TABLE ... AUTO_INCREMENT = value as of MySQL 5.0.3, but if the value is less than the current maximum value in the column, no error occurs and the current sequence value is not changed.

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