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I asked a similar question to this already, but I still can't see the problem?

-(id)initWithKeyPadType: (int)value
{
    [self setKeyPadType:value];
    self = [self init];
    if( self != nil )
    {
        //self.intKeyPadType = value;

    }
    return self;
}

- (id)init {

    NSNumberFormatter *formatter = [[[NSNumberFormatter alloc] init] 
                                                              autorelease];
    decimalSymbol = [formatter decimalSeparator];
....

The warning comes from the line above Instance variable used while 'self' is not set to the result of '[(super or self) init...]'

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1  
if I understand right your code, you are using a variable before calling the [super init] and this can mess your memory allocation –  il Malvagio Dottor Prosciutto Nov 10 '11 at 22:09
    
He's not calling super init anywhere –  jrturton Nov 10 '11 at 22:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

What you are trying to do is technically OK, but at some stage you need to invoke [super init]. If your class's init method does a lot of common initialisation that other initWith... methods utilise, then put your [super init] in there. Also, always make sure that the class has been init'd before trying to play around with instance variables.

- (id) initWithKeyPadType: (int)value
{
    self = [self init]; // invoke common initialisation
    if( self != nil )
    {
        [self setKeyPadType:value];
    }
    return self;
}

- (id) init
{
    self = [super init]; // invoke NSObject initialisation (or whoever superclass is)
    if (!self) return nil;

    NSNumberFormatter *formatter = [[[NSNumberFormatter alloc] init] 
                                                          autorelease];
    decimalSymbol = [formatter decimalSeparator];

    ...
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Can you say more about the actual risk that the GCC warning serves to point out? Assuming the zeroing of the object memory happens at alloc time (which I believe is right), it seems that only a @public or @protected ivar would be at risk of being clobbered by a superclass's init method, necessitating the warning. I can't think of why the warning would be useful for a private ivar, except stylistically, but that's not usually the compiler's concern. –  Ben Zotto Nov 11 '11 at 2:03
    
@quixoto: +alloc does zero out memory. I've got no idea why it's important either... It may have something to do with the fact that a call to [super init] may return nil, and if it does then all [sub init] methods should also return nil. Other than that I wouldn't have a clue why GCC would care. –  dreamlax Nov 13 '11 at 19:39

The warning means what it says. You are assigning something to decimalSymbol, which is an instance variable, but at that point there is no instance. You need a

self = [super init];

At the start of your init method. At some point the object has to be created, at some point this has to call back to NSObject (via a chain of super inits).

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3  
It's a little strong to say "there is no instance." alloc should have already created the instance. The problem is that the instance may not have been correctly initialized (since that is what init does). –  Chuck Nov 10 '11 at 22:15
    
OK, true. No "working" instance? –  jrturton Nov 10 '11 at 22:18

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