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i have a 6x6 matrix as a list of lists in python. The matrix is divided into 4 square blocks of size 3x3. I want a way to take a transpose of only 1 block. I can do it using the traditional method of going through each element and copying it into another array and back and so on but I want to see if there is a better way, (transposing a matrix in python can be done in one line using the zip method)

for eg this is the representation of the matrix and its blocks

 block 1  block 2
+-------+-------+
| . . . | . . . |
| . . 2 | 1 . . |
| . . . | . . . |
+-------+-------+
| . . . | . . . |
| . . . | . . . |
| . 1 . | . . . |
+-------+-------+
 block 3  block 4

and rotate(3, right) should result in this

 block 1  block 2
+-------+-------+
| . . . | . . . |
| . . 2 | 1 . . |
| . . . | . . . |
+-------+-------+
| . . . | . . . |
| 1 . . | . . . |
| . . . | . . . |
+-------+-------+
 block 3  block 4

I want to find a method that takes in a block number and rotates only that block left or right. Is there any easy way to do it?

share|improve this question
1  
Should the operation be in place? –  Sven Marnach Nov 10 '11 at 22:52
    
yes, It needs to be in place, or at least, the result needs to be written back to the original matrix –  randomThought Nov 10 '11 at 23:00

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Building on Sven Marnach's idea to use np.rot90, here is a version which rotates the quadrant clockwise (as requested?). In the key step

block3[:] = np.rot90(block3.copy(),-1)

a copy() is used on the right-hand side (RHS). Without the copy(), as values are assigned to block3, the underlying data used on the RHS is also changed. This muddles the values used in subsquent assignments. Without the copy(), multiple same values are spread about block3.

I don't see a way to do this operation without a copy.

import numpy as np
a = np.arange(36).reshape(6, 6)
print(a)
# [[ 0  1  2  3  4  5]
#  [ 6  7  8  9 10 11]
#  [12 13 14 15 16 17]
#  [18 19 20 21 22 23]
#  [24 25 26 27 28 29]
#  [30 31 32 33 34 35]]
block3 = a[3:6, 0:3]

# To rotate counterclockwise
block3[:] = np.rot90(block3.copy())
print(a)
# [[ 0  1  2  3  4  5]
#  [ 6  7  8  9 10 11]
#  [12 13 14 15 16 17]
#  [20 26 32 21 22 23]
#  [19 25 31 27 28 29]
#  [18 24 30 33 34 35]]

# To rotate clockwise
a = np.arange(36).reshape(6, 6)
block3 = a[3:6, 0:3]
block3[:] = np.rot90(block3.copy(),-1)
print(a)
# [[ 0  1  2  3  4  5]
#  [ 6  7  8  9 10 11]
#  [12 13 14 15 16 17]
#  [30 24 18 21 22 23]
#  [31 25 19 27 28 29]
#  [32 26 20 33 34 35]]
share|improve this answer

For what it's worth, here's how simple this in in NumPy:

>>> a = numpy.arange(36).reshape(6, 6)
>>> a
array([[ 0,  1,  2,  3,  4,  5],
       [ 6,  7,  8,  9, 10, 11],
       [12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17],
       [18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23],
       [24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29],
       [30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35]])
>>> block3 = a[3:6, 0:3]
>>> block3[:] = numpy.rot90(block3, 1).copy()
>>> a
array([[ 0,  1,  2,  3,  4,  5],
       [ 6,  7,  8,  9, 10, 11],
       [12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17],
       [20, 26, 32, 21, 22, 23],
       [26, 25, 31, 27, 28, 29],
       [20, 26, 20, 33, 34, 35]])
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for numpy.rot90. Note however that copying the right-hand side to block3[:] in-place has an undesireable side-effect -- as new values are assigned to block3, the underlying values on the right-hand side get overwritten too, leaving multiple copies of the same value in the result. –  unutbu Nov 11 '11 at 2:39
    
@unutbu: Thanks for pointing this out. I didn't even look at the result -- I was sure numpy.rot90() is returning a new array, not a view. –  Sven Marnach Nov 11 '11 at 3:33

Would it be a solution to define a matrix as a dictionary of blocks and a block as a list of lists? In your example (replace transpose() with the function you use to transpose it):

Matrix={1:block1,2:block2,3:block3,4:block4}
block3=transpose(block3)
Matrix[3]=block3
share|improve this answer
    
not really since I need to perform other matrix operations which this structure will not allow or will over complicate. –  randomThought Nov 10 '11 at 23:14

Here is a method to rotate a "Block" from the matrix you have provided:

matrix = [[0,1,2],[3,4,5],[6,7,8]]

def rotate(m, right):
    rm = []
    for i in range(0,len(m)):
        if right:
            rm.append([row[i] for row in reversed(m)])
        else:
            rm.append([row[i] for row in m])
    return rm

right is a Bool
This will return a list of lists

you can also use:

def rotate(m, right):
    if right:
        return list(zip(*reversed(m)))
    else:
        return list(zip(*m))

but this will return a list of tuples


EDIT:

If we are talking about a matrix of type:

matrix = [[[1,2,3],[4,5,6],[7,8,9]], # block 1
          [[1,2,3],[4,5,6],[7,8,9]], # block 2
          [[1,2,3],[4,5,6],[7,8,9]], # block 3
          [[1,2,3],[4,5,6],[7,8,9]]  # block 4
         ]

you would access block 3 by using matrix[2]

so the rotate function would be used like:
rotate(matrix[2], True) #rotate block 3, right

share|improve this answer
    
yes. the entire matrix a list of list of numbers. –  randomThought Nov 10 '11 at 23:16
    
A list of list of numbers it the matrix I provided in the example, if its a list of list of list of numbers, you can select the 3rd block by simply going rotate(matrix[2], True/False) –  Serdalis Nov 10 '11 at 23:21
    
but how do you extract only the block to pass it into the function? –  randomThought Nov 10 '11 at 23:33
    
one "block" of a list of lists of lists of numbers is a list of lists of numbers which would equate to matrix[x] so to pass the first block you would use matrix[0], to pass the second matrix[1] etc, etc. –  Serdalis Nov 10 '11 at 23:40
    
its only a list of list of numbers, not 3 nested lists. –  randomThought Nov 10 '11 at 23:45

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