Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am developing a threadsafe lazy object pattern in C++ using boost. However while doing so I if my application has more than one thread, I get into a deadlocked state in LazyObject's calculate() method.

This is somehow related to boost::recursive_mutex::scoped_try_lock because once I shielded the code with regular mutex and just let other threads wait on this mutex, everything went just fine. However the drawback of just blocking other threads is that they effectively all need to go through time consuming performCalculations() because one thread is changing calculated_ flag to false very often. Also note that performCalculations() is purely virtual and derived instances will recursively call LazyObject::calculate(). I want to shield this infinite recursion with mutex.

Can you see where I go wrong here?

My LazyObject has following attributes:

// protects resource frozen_ from simultaneous freeze, unfreeze calls
mutable boost::mutex frozenMutex_;
// protects resource calculated_ from simultaneous update, calculate calls
mutable boost::mutex calculatedMutex_;

// protects that only one thread can simultaneously call calculate
mutable boost::recursive_try_mutex waitMutex_;
// protects that only once can performCalculations be called (from same thread)
mutable boost::mutex blockingMutex_;

// mutex and semaphore for sleeping threads until calculate is ready
mutable boost::mutex condMutex_;
mutable boost::condition_variable condVariable_;

inline void LazyObject::calculate() const {

    boost::recursive_mutex::scoped_try_lock lock(waitMutex_);
    if (lock) {
        //recursive lock lets same thread pass, puts others on wait
        if (!calculated_ && !frozen_ && blockingMutex_.try_lock()) {
            // blockingMutex ensures that only once same thread 
            // can call performCalculations
            try {
                performCalculations();
                calculated_ = true;
                blockingMutex_.unlock();
                condVariable_.notify_all();
            } catch (...) {
                calculated_ = false;
                blockingMutex_.unlock();
                condVariable_.notify_all();
                throw;
            }   
        }
    } else {
        // start a non blocking wait until calculation is ready
        boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock(condMutex_);
        condVariable_.wait(lock);
    }
}
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

The one function you've provided looks sound.

However, I strongly suspect you have lock ordering issues. You have 5 mutexes in a single class. You need to guarantee that those mutexes are always locked in the same order. Otherwise you'll have a dead lock.

It looks like you have a very complicated lock order:

  • 5 different mutexes
  • 1 is recursive
  • at least on try lock
share|improve this answer
    
Actually there was a problem. I did not take into account the obvious. The obvious case was that once lazy object is calculated, and subsequent calls to calculate happen, all calls should be returned back as the state of the object is up to date.it should no nothing. In the above implementation some threads go to sleep –  Lauri Nov 11 '11 at 16:46

Perhaps you could provide a description of what you want to achieve. You haven't provide the whole code, so one could only guess.

For example, you can deadlock if one thread has just set calculated_ to true, executed condVariable_.notifyAll() and gets preempted before unlocking waitMutex_ and then another thread blocks in condVariable_.wait(lock) and then nobody ever comes to wake it up.

I see in the comment you have written "mutex and semaphore", note that the condition variable has no memory, it's nothing like a semaphore or a Windows event object.

Give a better description of the problem, I don't really think this code above is salvageable :)

share|improve this answer

You are correct that the above function did not give a clear understanding of the whole picture. Basically below are all interacting functions that race for the resources of *this

I was able to reduce the amount of mutexes to using only 3. But I think the problem cannot be practically solved with less amount of mutexes. Pre requisite is that update method must be as cheap as possible.

I still have one question relating to exception throwing. As you can see, the calculating thread executing performCalculations can throw an exception. IF there are some threads waiting for signal to move on, they just cannot continue as any exceptions had even happened. Is it possible using boost to somehow let waking threads to throw SAME exception as was thrown in the signaling thread. If yes, can you provide explicit code how the idea works?

My class needs following attirbutes.

// state variables indicating is calculation necessary
mutable bool calculated_, frozen_;

// flag that tells waking threads to throw exceptions if
// LazyObject::performCalculations() threw any exceptions 
mutable bool failed_;
// flag avoiding infinite recursion on single thread not recursively 
// calling LazyObject::performCalculations() through recursive calls 
// to LazyObject::calculate()
mutable bool calculating_;

// protects resources from simultaneous read & writes
mutable boost::mutex readWriteMutex_;

// protects that only one thread can simultaneously call calculate
//mutable boost::mutex waitMutex_;
mutable boost::recursive_try_mutex waitMutex_;

// mutex and semaphore for sleeping threads until calculate is ready
mutable boost::mutex condMutex_;
mutable boost::condition_variable condVariable_;


inline void LazyObject::performCalculations() {
    // let derived classes specialize own implementation
}

inline void LazyObject::update() {
    // observers don't expect notifications from frozen objects
    // LazyObject forwards notifications only once until it has been 
    // recalculated
    readWriteMutex_.lock();
    calculated_ = false;
    readWriteMutex_.unlock();
    if (!frozen_) {
        notifyObservers();
    }
}

inline void LazyObject::recalculate() {
    readWriteMutex_.lock();
    bool wasFrozen = frozen_;
    calculated_ = frozen_ = false;
    try {
        readWriteMutex_.unlock();
        calculate();
    } catch (...) {
        readWriteMutex_.lock();
        frozen_ = wasFrozen;
        readWriteMutex_.unlock();
        notifyObservers();
        throw;
    }
    readWriteMutex_.lock();
    frozen_ = wasFrozen;
    readWriteMutex_.unlock();
    notifyObservers();
}

inline void LazyObject::freeze() {
    readWriteMutex_.lock();
    frozen_ = true;
    readWriteMutex_.unlock();
}

inline void LazyObject::unfreeze() {
    readWriteMutex_.lock();
    frozen_ = false;
    readWriteMutex_.unlock();
    // send notification, just in case we lost any
    notifyObservers();
}

inline void LazyObject::calculate() const {

    //boost::recursive_mutex::scoped_try_lock lock(waitMutex_); 

    readWriteMutex_.lock();
    // see a snapshot of object's status
    if (!calculated_ && !frozen_) {
        if (waitMutex_.try_lock()) {
            //recursive lock lets same thread pass, puts others on wait
            if (calculating_) {
                readWriteMutex_.unlock();
                waitMutex_.unlock();
                return;
            } else {
                calculating_ = true;
            }
            readWriteMutex_.unlock();

            try {
                performCalculations();

                readWriteMutex_.lock();
                calculating_ = false;
                failed_ = false;
                calculated_ = true;
                readWriteMutex_.unlock();
                waitMutex_.unlock();
                condVariable_.notify_all();
                return;
            } catch (...) {
                readWriteMutex_.lock();
                calculating_ = false;
                failed_ = true;
                calculated_ = false;
                readWriteMutex_.unlock();
                waitMutex_.unlock();
                condVariable_.notify_all();
                throw;
            }   
        } else {
            // start a non blocking wait until calculation is ready
            readWriteMutex_.unlock();
            boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock(condMutex_);
            condVariable_.wait(lock);
            if (failed_)
                throw std::exception();
            else
                return;
        }
    }
    // no need to calculate
    readWriteMutex_.unlock();
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.