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I am trying to arrange a bunch of subplots in a grid like fashion. The problem is that the number of subplots varies with user selection of what data to plot. Right now I am trying to add plots this way:

    l = len(clicked)

    self.p=wx.Panel(self)
    self.dpi=100
    self.fig = Figure()
    self.canvas = FigCanvas(self.p, -1, self.fig)
    if l == 1:
        self.splt = self.fig.add_subplot(1,1,1)
        self.plt=self.splt.plot(np.arange(5),np.arange(5))
    else:
        for i in np.arange(l):
            self.splt=self.fig.add_subplot(l+1,2,i+1)
            self.fig.subplots_adjust(left=0.7, bottom=0.6, right=0.75, top=0.75)
            self.plt=self.splt.plot(np.arange(5),np.arange(5))

I am just using fake data for debugging purposes. Anyhow, I am using wxPython to draw this inside a frame. clicked here provides the number of selections the user made. I already tried using subplots_adjust(), with quite the opposite result than I wanted. The plots are being shrunk something indiscernable. Is there a way to arrange teh plots in some sort of grid. I saw there is an option subplot2grid, but I havent gotten it to work with the variable number of subplots.

Thanks for any input.

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Can you indicate how you want your grid to be arranged? For 1 subplot the case is clear, but how about 2, 5, 9, or 217? –  Daan Nov 14 '11 at 7:50
    
The number of subplot varies and that is the problem I am having. There can be up to about 90ish plots –  madtowneast Nov 15 '11 at 1:15
    
But is there a fixed aspect ratio that you want? 90 plots could be 1x90, 2x45, 3x30, &c. subplot(L,1,i+1) would work just fine, but might not be what you want with 90 plots. subplot(ceil(sqrt(L)), ceil(sqrt(L)), i+1) would give you a different grid that also facilitates 90 plots without ado. So, can you tell us (or show us with a little sketch) what end result you desire? –  Daan Nov 15 '11 at 7:49
    
I have tried the ceil(sqrt()) thing, the problem is that is leaves a lot of whitespace at the bottom in case of odd number of plots which I am trying to avoid. From some testing, I would like to have something with 3x1, 2x2, 3x2, etc. switching basically between 2 and 3 rows with a varying number of columns depending if odd or even number. –  madtowneast Nov 15 '11 at 18:27
    
So, if the answer below doesn't suit you, could you perhaps indicate why not? Maybe someone can come up with a better solution based on this additional input? If you managed to solve the problem yourself, you could consider adding your own answer. –  Daan Nov 22 '11 at 13:55

1 Answer 1

Hopefully this helps:

from __future__ import division
import numpy as np
import pylab as plt

def divideSquare(N):
    if N<1:
        return 1,1

    minX = max(1,int(np.floor(np.sqrt(N))))
    maxX = max(minX+1, int(np.ceil(np.sqrt(5.0/3*N))))
    Nx = range(minX, maxX+1)
    Ny = [np.ceil(N/y) for y in Nx]
    err = [np.uint8(y*x - N) for y in Nx for x in Ny]
    ind = np.argmin(err)
    y = Nx[int(ind/len(Ny))]
    x = Ny[ind%len(Nx)]
    return min(y,x), max(y,x)

Nlist = np.arange(0,101)
empty = np.zeros_like(Nlist)
ratio = np.zeros_like(Nlist, dtype = float)
for k, N in enumerate(Nlist):
    y,x = divideSquare(N)
    empty[k] = y*x - N
    ratio[k] = 1.0 * x/y
    print y,x,y/x

plt.figure(1)
plt.clf()
y,x = divideSquare(2)
plt.subplot(y,x,1)    
plt.plot(Nlist, empty, 'k')
plt.xlabel('Number of plots')
plt.ylabel('Empty squares left')
plt.subplot(y,x,2)
plt.plot(Nlist, ratio, 'r')
plt.xlabel('Number of plots')
plt.ylabel('Ratio')

def divide2or3(N):
    if N<1:
        return 1,1
    if N%2==0:
        return int(np.ceil(N/2)), 2
    return int(np.ceil(N/3)), 3

Nlist = np.arange(0,101)
empty = np.zeros_like(Nlist)
ratio = np.zeros_like(Nlist, dtype = float)
for k, N in enumerate(Nlist):
    y,x = divide2or3(N)
    empty[k] = y*x - N
    ratio[k] = 1.0 * x/y
    print y,x,y/x

plt.figure(2)
plt.clf()
y,x = divide2or3(2)
plt.subplot(y,x,1)    
plt.plot(Nlist, empty, 'k')
plt.xlabel('Number of plots')
plt.ylabel('Empty squares left')
plt.subplot(y,x,2)
plt.plot(Nlist, ratio, 'r')
plt.xlabel('Number of plots')
plt.ylabel('Ratio')

plt.show()

divideSquare(N) attempts to get a ratio close to 1 but with a minimal number of empty positions. divide2or3(N) gives you a grid of 2 or 3 columns (or rows if you invert x and y), but I'm not sure if this is what you want for 90 plots.

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