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I am trying to write a program that generates all the subsets of an entered set in java. I think i nearly have it working.

  • I have to use arrays (not data structures)
  • The entered array will never be greater than 20

Right now when i run my code this is what i get:

Please enter the size of A: 3
Please enter A: 1 2 3
Please enter the number N: 3
Subsets: 
{ }
{ 1 }
{ 1 2 }
{ 1 2 3 }
{ 2 3 }
{ 2 3 }
{ 2 }
{ 1 2 }

this is the correct number of subsets (2^size) but as you can see it prints a few duplicates and not some of the subsets.

Any ideas where I am going wrong in my code?

import java.util.Scanner;

public class subSetGenerator 
{   
    // Fill an array with 0's and 1's
    public static int [] fillArray(int [] set, int size)
    {
        int[] answer;
        answer = new int[20];

        // Initialize all elements to 1
        for (int i = 0; i < answer.length; i++)
            answer[i] = 1;

        for (int a = 0; a < set.length; a++)
            if (set[a] > 0)
                answer[a] = 0;  

        return answer;
    } // end fill array

    // Generate a mask
    public static void maskMaker(int [] binarySet, int [] set, int n, int size)
    {
        int carry;
        int count = 0;
        boolean done = false;

        if (binarySet[0] == 0)
            carry = 0;

        else
            carry = 1;

        int answer = (int) Math.pow(2, size);

        for (int i = 0; i < answer - 1; i++)
        {
            if (count == answer - 1)
            {
                done = true;
                break;
            }

            if (i == size)
                i = 0;

            if (binarySet[i] == 1 && carry == 1)
            {
                binarySet[i] = 0;
                carry = 0;
                count++;
            } // end if

            else
            {
                binarySet[i] = 1;
                carry = 1;
                count++;
                //break;
            } // end else

            //print the set
            System.out.print("{ ");

            for (int k = 0; k < size; k++)
                if (binarySet[k] == 1)
                    System.out.print(set[k] + " ");             

            System.out.println("}");

        } // end for

    } // maskMaker

    public static void main (String args [])
    {
        Scanner scan = new Scanner(System.in);
        int[] set;           
        set = new int[20];
        int size = 0;  
        int n = 0;

        // take input for A and B set
        System.out.print("Please enter the size of A: ");
        size = scan.nextInt();

        if (size > 0)
        {
            System.out.print("Please enter A: ");
            for (int i = 0; i < size; i++)
                set[i] = scan.nextInt();
        } // end if

        System.out.print("Please enter the number N: ");
        n = scan.nextInt();

        //System.out.println("Subsets with sum " + n + ": ");
        System.out.println("Subsets: ");

        System.out.println("{ }");
        maskMaker(fillArray(set, size), set, n, size);

    } // end main

}  // end class
share|improve this question
    
lol not other* data structures – Corbin Carter Nov 11 '11 at 0:27
    
Please use the search feature: stackoverflow.com/search?q=%5Bjava%5D+subsets – NullUserException Nov 11 '11 at 0:30
    
none using just arrays. . . – Corbin Carter Nov 11 '11 at 0:35

The value of i always goes from 0 to N-1 and then back to 0. This is not useful to generate every binary mask you need only one time. If you think about it, you need to move i only when you have generate all possible masks up to i-1.

There is a much easier way to do this if you remember every number is already internally represented in binary in the computer and everytime you increment it Java is doing the adding and carrying by itself. Look for bitwise operators.

share|improve this answer

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