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This is what I have in foo.php

class Foo
{
    public $foo = NULL;
    public $foo2 = NULL;

    public function setFoo ($foo, $foo2)
    {
       $this->foo = $foo;
       $this->foo2 = $foo2'
    }
}

This is what I have in foo3.php

class Foo3 extends Foo
{
    public $foo3 = NULL;

    public function setFoo3 ($foo3)
    {
       $this->foo = $foo3;
    }
}  

This is how I require it in my third file run.php:

require_once "foo.php";
require_once "foo3.php";
$foo = new Foo();
$foo->setFoo3("hello");

I get this error:

Fatal error: Call to undefined method Foo::setFoo3()

I'm not sure if the problem is how I'm requiring them. Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
i don't see any "extend" keyword in this. Check: php.net/manual/en/keyword.extends.php –  racar Nov 11 '11 at 2:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In your example, you are instantiating Foo, which is the parent and has no knowledge of the method setFoo3(). Try this:

class Foo3 extends Foo
{
    ...
}

require_once "foo.php";
require_once "foo3.php";
$foo = new Foo3();
$foo->setFoo3("hello");
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this worked! –  diesel Nov 11 '11 at 2:04
    
if i do not require_once "foo.php" in the Foo3 file, it still works. Is it good practice to require the file that I am extending? I assume it would be. –  diesel Nov 11 '11 at 2:07
    
Short answer yes. Long answer, autoloading (us.php.net/manual/en/function.spl-autoload-register.php). –  Mike Purcell Nov 11 '11 at 2:08
    
Thanks! I will certainly looking into that. –  diesel Nov 11 '11 at 2:24

At the first, in your foo.php shouldn't mark your fields public, because you set those values inside setFoo($foo1, $foo2) method. Instead, you may have something like:

<?php

class Foo
{
    private $foo1;
    private $foo2;

    public function setFoo($foo1, $foo2) {
        $this->foo1 = $foo1;
        $this->foo2 = $foo2;
    }
 }

Then you should add extends keyword when declaring class Foo3, and another thing you need to include extending class file in the beginning of the file. In your case you may have something like the following in your foo3.php file:

<?php

require_once "foo.php";

class Foo3 extends Foo
{
    public function setFoo3($foo3) {
        $this->setFoo($foo3, "some foo3 specific value"); // calling superclass method
    }
}

then you can create an instantiate of a Foo3 class in your run.php like so:

<?php

require_once "foo3.php";

$foo3 = new Foo3();
$foo3->setFoo3("bar");

and my advice, you should read a little about OOP techniques ;)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks ;) Is there a specific reason not to do "$this->foo = $foo3;" but to do the super class method? –  diesel Nov 11 '11 at 5:43
    
Nope, you can if you need. Think how to design your classes, for example a Person class instead of your Foo can contain a fields that describes common person properties. In this case a subclasses (all those extending Person class) you may have, are for example Teacher and Student each containing properties that is specific for his needs. –  Dan K.K. Nov 12 '11 at 12:32

Of course that doesn't work. You've created a Foo object, and then tried to call foo3 on it. But Foo doesn't have a foo3 method.

share|improve this answer
    
Such a silly mistake. It's still a learning experience :) –  diesel Nov 11 '11 at 2:04

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