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I am trying to reimplement in python an IDL function:

http://star.pst.qub.ac.uk/idl/REBIN.html

which downsizes by an integer factor a 2d array by averaging.

For example:

>>> a=np.arange(24).reshape((4,6))
>>> a
array([[ 0,  1,  2,  3,  4,  5],
       [ 6,  7,  8,  9, 10, 11],
       [12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17],
       [18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23]])

I would like to resize it to (2,3) by taking the mean of the relevant samples, the expected output would be:

>>> b = rebin(a, (2, 3))
>>> b
array([[  3.5,   5.5,  7.5],
       [ 15.5, 17.5,  19.5]])

i.e. b[0,0] = np.mean(a[:2,:2]), b[0,1] = np.mean(a[:2,2:4]) and so on.

I believe I should reshape to a 4 dimensional array and then take the mean on the correct slice, but could not figure out the algorithm. Would you have any hint?

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1  
just found now this is a duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/4624112/…, however I could not find this before using the search function in stackoverflow. –  Andrea Zonca Nov 11 '11 at 5:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Here's an example based on the answer you've linked (for clarity):

>>> import numpy as np
>>> a = np.arange(24).reshape((4,6))
>>> a
array([[ 0,  1,  2,  3,  4,  5],
       [ 6,  7,  8,  9, 10, 11],
       [12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17],
       [18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23]])
>>> a.reshape((2,a.shape[0]//2,3,-1)).mean(axis=3).mean(1)
array([[  3.5,   5.5,   7.5],
       [ 15.5,  17.5,  19.5]])

As a function:

def rebin(a, shape):
    sh = shape[0],a.shape[0]//shape[0],shape[1],a.shape[1]//shape[1]
    return a.reshape(sh).mean(-1).mean(1)
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wow. very elegant solution! –  Simon Nov 11 '11 at 9:02
    
thanks, I have created gist on github with the implementation of this function, in case somebody else needs it: gist.github.com/1348792, I also suggested on numpy-discussion to add it to numpy but the answer was negative. –  Andrea Zonca Nov 12 '11 at 4:05
    
did they give a reason for the negative answer? –  K.-Michael Aye Oct 18 '12 at 5:47
    
I think this is the discussion. Doesn't seem to negative, just more a lack of time or not enough interest. –  Evert Jan 15 '13 at 16:32
    
Bear in mind that doing a mean over data which has a NaN will return a NaN. So if you want a mean that ignores any NaN values you will need nanmean() instead. Still a great answer. –  timbo Jun 3 '14 at 4:02

J.F. Sebastian has a great answer for 2D binning. Here is a version of his "rebin" function that works for N dimensions:

def bin_ndarray(ndarray, new_shape, operation='sum'):
    """
    Bins an ndarray in all axes based on the target shape, by summing or
        averaging.

    Number of output dimensions must match number of input dimensions.

    Example
    -------
    >>> m = np.arange(0,100,1).reshape((10,10))
    >>> n = bin_ndarray(m, new_shape=(5,5), operation='sum')
    >>> print(n)

    [[ 22  30  38  46  54]
     [102 110 118 126 134]
     [182 190 198 206 214]
     [262 270 278 286 294]
     [342 350 358 366 374]]

    """
    if not operation.lower() in ['sum', 'mean', 'average', 'avg']:
        raise ValueError("Operation not supported.")
    if ndarray.ndim != len(new_shape):
        raise ValueError("Shape mismatch: {} -> {}".format(ndarray.shape,
                                                           new_shape))
    compression_pairs = [(d, c//d) for d,c in zip(new_shape,
                                                  ndarray.shape)]
    flattened = [l for p in compression_pairs for l in p]
    ndarray = ndarray.reshape(flattened)
    for i in range(len(new_shape)):
        if operation.lower() == "sum":
            ndarray = ndarray.sum(-1*(i+1))
        elif operation.lower() in ["mean", "average", "avg"]:
            ndarray = ndarray.mean(-1*(i+1))
    return ndarray
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