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Alright, so I'm trying to make a Java program to solve a picross board, but I keep getting a Stackoverflow error. I'm currently just teaching myself a little Java, and so I like to use the things I know rather than finding a solution online, although my way is obviously not as efficient. The only way I could think of solving this was through a type of brute force, trying every possibility. The thing is, I know that this function works because it works for smaller sized boards, the only problem is that with larger boards, I tend to get errors before the function finishes.

so char[][] a is just the game board with all the X's and O's. int[][] b is an array with the numbers assigned for the picross board like the numbers on the top and to the left of the game. isDone() just checks if the board matches up with the given numbers, and shift() shifts one column down. I didn't want to paste my entire program, so if you need more information, let me know. Thanks!

I added the code for shift since someone asked. Shift just moves all the chars in one row up one cell.

Update: I'm thinking that maybe my code isn't spinning through every combination, and so it skips over the correct answer. Can anyone verify is this is actually trying every possible combination? Because that would explain why I'm getting stackoverflow errors. On the other hand though, how many iterations can this go through before it's too much?

public static void shifter(char[][] a, int[][] b, int[] clockwork)
{
    boolean correct = true;

    correct = isDone(a, b);

    if(correct)
        return;

    clockwork[a[0].length - 1]++;

        for(int x = a[0].length - 1; x > 0; x--)
        {
            if(clockwork[x] > a.length)
            {
                shift(a, x - 1);

                clockwork[x - 1]++;
                clockwork[x] = 1;
            }

            correct = isDone(a, b);

            if(correct)
                return;
        }

    shift(a, a[0].length - 1);

    correct = isDone(a, b);

    if(correct)
        return;

    shifter(a, b, clockwork);

    return;
}

public static char[][] shift(char[][] a, int y)
{       
        char temp = a[0][y];

            for(int shifter = 0; shifter < a.length - 1; shifter++)
            {
                a[shifter][y] = a[shifter + 1][y];
            }

        a[a.length - 1][y] = temp;

    return a;
}
share|improve this question
    
after how many iterations/recursions does it blow up? –  Tom Nov 11 '11 at 6:38
    
consider making shifter a void function rather than returning a[][]. a[][] is already passed by reference in java. –  Tom Nov 11 '11 at 6:49
    
Uh, I'm not sure exactly how many iterations it goes through. It seems like a good portion of a 5x5 board. How many can it usually handle before crashing? How would I go about making shifter a void function? –  Bryant Ku Nov 11 '11 at 6:55
    
What does shift do? –  kan Nov 11 '11 at 8:55
    
so for a 5x5 board in the current way the function is written you push 25 chars on the stack for each iteration, but I have to admit I'm not too sure of that. You can avoid that and tidy up the code at the same time by going to a void function and changing the a[][] by reference. Whichever action you take on a[][] inside the routines is already reflected in the original array because only the memory location to the a[][] is passed on. –  Tom Nov 11 '11 at 18:00

1 Answer 1

Check Recursive call.and give the termination condition.

if(terminate condition)
{
exit();
}
else
{
call shifter()
}
share|improve this answer
    
If by termination condition, you mean the error I'm getting, this is it. Exception in thread "main" java.lang.StackOverflowError, and then it just repeats the line with function in the main like 40 times. I don't know what you mean by checking the recursive call though. –  Bryant Ku Nov 11 '11 at 7:13
    
You must know how many times you want to call the function. –  vikky Nov 11 '11 at 7:14
    
Sorry, I'm still pretty new to java. I'm not sure how to use the termination condition. Well, originally, I was planning on solving it with just straight up for-loops, but because the size of the board changes, I had to switch to a recursive. –  Bryant Ku Nov 11 '11 at 7:21

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