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I'm currently in the process of writing an application that has quite a number of mathematically calculations in it. In some situations, these calculations need to be done quickly and we can deal with a small amount of precision loss to get the maths done as fast as possible. On the other hand, sometimes we require that the calculations be done very precisely (and there are use cases for in between, where we would implement our own way of doing multiplication/division/addition/subtraction/power etc that is more precise that float * float (or double * double, I am aware that float is a bad choice), but faster than BigDecimal.multiply(BigDecimal)... or even something like apfloat rather than BigDecimal).

Are there any existing libraries that allow an abstraction of such number formats, so that different ways of doing the maths are abstracted away, or do I have to create my own?

I've started coding up something, which seems to be working okay, but it would be far better to have a nicely tested library rather than reinventing the wheel I think.

EDITED to clarify the situation with content from a comment below:

The problem is that BigDecimal is significantly slower than double * double etc. We need to be able to switch between precision and speed. The reasoning behind this is that we need to be able to run fast tests for debugging and cross checks with real world data (which does not need to be perfectly accurate), but the final simulation (which will often take days to weeks: unacceptable for debugging) will require high precision. Thus the need to be able to switch at will.

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What's your problem with apfloat? –  zeller Nov 11 '11 at 7:57
    
We need to be able to switch between super high speed and high precision. Our application will run for days to weeks at a time, which is unacceptable for simple tests (that don't require high precision). For more info, see my comment to Peter Lawrey below. –  Ricky Cook Nov 14 '11 at 0:33
    
I don't know any arbitrary precision library for java that is faster than apfloat... Or even any such lib for java that uses floating point numbers. A workaround is to use integers, than you can use JScience, and later divide by the scale. –  zeller Nov 14 '11 at 9:43
    
Well, it doesn't have to be arbitrary precision. We only need about 5-10 points of precision, but they MUST be guaranteed to be perfectly accurate. Ideally, I'd like a fixed point library, but that's not the topic of the question. The topic of the question is an abstraction library that allows changing between arbitrary precision/fixed point/native calculation methods (or even variations thereof). –  Ricky Cook Nov 14 '11 at 13:11
    
Well I don't know such a library, but of course it doesn't mean that none exists. (But if really none exists, you could implement it for yourself with a strategy pattern e.g., though it reduces performance a bit) –  zeller Nov 14 '11 at 14:26

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

double has more than twice the precision as float and is typically no more than 10% slower. IMHO, there is a very rarely a good reason to use float, using double or BigDecimal is usually better.

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I agree, on the double front. I started (stupidly) using floats and have been in the process of changing them all to double. The problem is that BigDecimal is significantly slower than double * double etc. We need to be able to switch between precision and speed. The reasoning behind this is that we need to be able to run fast tests for debugging and cross checks with real world data, but the final simulation (which will often take days to weeks: unacceptable for debugging) will require high precision. Thus the need to be able to switch at will. –  Ricky Cook Nov 14 '11 at 0:31
    
That said, I did like your answer so if nothing better comes along, I will accept it. –  Ricky Cook Nov 14 '11 at 1:51
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Many operations only use double precision so using float is actually slower. Where float can have a small gain is in better use of the cache. I agree that BigDecimal doesn't perform as well, but if you need more than 15 digits of precision it may be your only option. –  Peter Lawrey Nov 14 '11 at 7:00
    
Yeh, that's the point. Sometimes it's necessary, sometimes it's not. We need to be able to specify if we would like to sacrifice precision for speed, or speed for precision. I worked on my own abstraction library today. So far it seems to work quite well, and an implementation of calculations using long looks to be about 10x faster than BigDecimal when using JIT (though that could be my faulty benchmarking skills!), and on par with BigDecimal with the -Xint flag turned on. About 10% overhead when using a BigDecimal adapter. –  Ricky Cook Nov 14 '11 at 13:05
    
Also, said library will be released Open Source, since there seems to be no equivalent (though it's fairly simple at the moment and only implements a small subset of operations- add,sub,mult,div,pow) –  Ricky Cook Nov 14 '11 at 13:09

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