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Suppose I have the following:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

template<class T>
class base
{
public:
    void print()
    {
        T t = get();
        std::cout << t << std::endl;
    }

    virtual T get() const
    {
        // assumes T can be constructed from, say, -1
        T t = -1.0;
        return t;
    }
};

class derived : public base<std::string>
{
public:
    virtual std::string get() const
    {
        // this is a silly example, but one can
        // imagine that what we return here could
        // depend on data members of derived
        return "this is a string";
    }
};

int main()
{
    derived d;
    d.print();

    return 0;
}

It seems to me that d.print() should call derived::get() because get() is virtual. However, I'm getting a compiler error saying that I can't initialize a string to -1.0, which means that the compiler is trying to call base::get() when I call d.print(). What's going on?

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2  
This code does not compile, because print is private. Please post code you have tested and are sure that it exposes the problem. –  Björn Pollex Nov 11 '11 at 8:23
    
@BjörnPollex: The compiler doesn't generally get that far (or at least, not without prior errors), because the problem happens when he tries to instantiate base<std::string>. –  Nicol Bolas Nov 11 '11 at 8:26
    
@NicolBolas You misunderstood his comment. The example does not compile without fixes here and there –  BЈовић Nov 11 '11 at 8:28
    
@VJo You misunderstood his comment :). It implies, that OP posted exactly the code that he got error on –  Alexander Malakhov Nov 11 '11 at 8:33
    
@BjörnPollex: Those members should are meant to be public (I've edited the code in the question), and it is when they are public that I get the error. –  commernie Nov 11 '11 at 8:35

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

However, I'm getting a compiler error saying that I can't initialize a string to -1.0, which means that the compiler is trying to call base::get() when I call d.print().

No, that compiler error means that the compiler is trying to instantiate base<std::string>::get(), which it must do because derived uses base<std::string> as a base class. Just because you don't call a function doesn't mean you can't. You could still call base<std::string>::get() directly.

You instantiated base<std::string> and used it as a base class. Since base<std::string>::get() is a virtual function, it is considered "used" by the fact that you use base<std::string> as a base class. Since it is in use, it must be instantiated. So the compiler must and will attempt to compile the function.

And since std::string cannot be implicitly constructed from a float, the compiler errors out from a failed template substitution.

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1  
@commernie: You have accepted an answer that is wrong, until the answer is corrected I would reconsider the acceptance. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Nov 11 '11 at 8:41
1  
@NicolBolas: The statement is wrong, and anyone that comes and sees the answer will "understand" that all member functions are implicitly instantiated, and that is false, and trivial to demonstrate. The first line of the answer and the last paragraph are correct, everything else is not and only adds noise. Consider this: template <typename T> struct base { T get() { T = -1; } }; struct der : base<string> { string get() { return ""; } }; Why does this other piece of code compile? According to your answer it shouldn't, because it should instantiate base<string>::get() and that cannot compile –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Nov 11 '11 at 8:49
1  
@Nicol: I think, he didn't correct it himself, because it is a major change in your post and the logic of your answer depends on that change. Typos can be corrected by others without hesitation, not "claims". –  Nawaz Nov 11 '11 at 9:01
3  
@NicolBolas: As I understand the rules, editing another person's question or answer should not be done to change the meaning, but rather to fix issues like spelling, formatting and the like. Yes, I can edit the question, but I don't feel comfortable changing what you intended to say. I posted the comment because I think that it is important both for you, for the person that asked and for anyone that comes later to know that as it was, the answer was incorrect. I am removing my downvote now. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Nov 11 '11 at 9:02
4  
With regards to @DavidRodríguez-dribeas comments: an important point which David neglected to mention (except indirectly) is that a virtual function is considered used if an object of that type (or a type derived from it) is instantiated. (The motive for this: the compiler must put its address in the vtable.) So while his comments concerning the error in the original answer are correct, quick tests suppressing the problem line in the function may be misleading; the function in the base class is considered "used", even if it will never be called in actual execution. –  James Kanze Nov 11 '11 at 9:10

When you implicitly instantiate a class template, only those member functions that are used will be instantiated, as you already know or else you would not be asking this. The problem is that the definition of use in the standard may not be exactly what you expect, and in particular, any virtual function is used if it is not pure

§3.2p2 [...]A virtual member function is odr-used if it is not pure.[...]

And this means that base::get is used even if your code does not explicitly call it, and thus the compiler will implicitly instantiate it and trigger the compiler error that you are seeing.

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Would making it non-virtual fix this? –  commernie Nov 11 '11 at 8:54
1  
@commernie: You can fix it in different ways, if you make it non-virtual then it will compile, but at the same time, you cannot use it polymorphically through a reference to base<std::string>, that is, you will make it compile but will change the semantics. Alternatively you can fix the code so that even if it is instantiated it won't break (change initialization) or make the function pure (this again will change the semantics of the code) Deciding among the different options has to be done in the context of the problem to solve. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Nov 11 '11 at 8:58
    
+1. this seems to be a perfect answer. –  Nawaz Nov 11 '11 at 9:05
    
@DavidRodríguez-dribeas: Thanks for your answers. I understand perfectly. In retrospect, even my initial question seems rather silly. Anyway, I've found a way to fix it that I'm happy with and that gives me the desired behavior. Thanks again! –  commernie Nov 11 '11 at 9:14
T t = -1.0;

Of course, this wouldn't compile if T is std::string. It has nothing to do with get being virtual and which function will be called at runtime. Runtime comes after code gets compiled to machine code, and your code wouldn't even compile.

Why don't you do this:

T t = T(); 

Again it requires T to have a default constructor.

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Indeed. The change I have in mind is in the vein of what you suggest. Thanks! –  commernie Nov 11 '11 at 8:41

The problem is in this method (where T=std::string) :

virtual T get() const
{
    // assumes T can be constructed from, say, -1
    T t = -1.0;
    return t;
}

The compiler is right. You can not initialize std::string using a double value.

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