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I was testing a class that uses weak references to ensure that objects were able to be garbage collected and I found that objects in a List<> were never collected even if the list is no longer referenced. This is also the case with a simple array. The following code snippet shows a simple test that fails.

class TestDestructor
{
    public static bool DestructorCalled;

    ~TestDestructor()
    {
        DestructorCalled = true;
    }
}

[Test]
public void TestGarbageCollection()
{
    TestDestructor testDestructor = new TestDestructor();

    var array = new object[] { testDestructor };
    array = null;

    testDestructor = null;

    GC.Collect();
    GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();

    Assert.IsTrue(TestDestructor.DestructorCalled);
}

Leaving out the initialisation of the array causes the test to pass.

Why is the object in the array not getting garbage collected?

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1  
Just a guess, but is array "really" created? Maybe it's optimized away? Can you do something with the object before you destroy it to be sure? –  VoidStar Nov 11 '11 at 8:42
1  
You should also try putting a Console.WriteLine inside the destructor. –  Tudor Nov 11 '11 at 8:46
    
Is this to do with generations? On the garbage collection testDestructor still exists as an elemnet of the array (even if the array is dereferenced?) and so is not collected this cycle. What happens if you collect twice? –  Bob Vale Nov 11 '11 at 8:48
    
What Jon Skeet about the need for volatile here is true, this looks like a Debug vs Release issue to me. –  Ani Nov 11 '11 at 8:50
2  
@Jon: From briefly inspecting the IL, in release mode, it looks like the C# compiler elides the array allocation entirely. –  Ani Nov 11 '11 at 8:55

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Another edit: result will be always false if the array is defined in the Main()-Method-Scope, but will be true if defined in the Class-Test-Scope. Maybe thats not a bad thing.

class TestDestructor
{
    public TestDestructor()
    {
        testList = new List<string>();
    }

    public static volatile bool DestructorCalled;

    ~TestDestructor()
    {
        DestructorCalled = true;
    }

    public string xy = "test";

    public List<string> testList;

}

class Test
{
    private static object[] myArray;

    static void Main()
    {
        NewMethod();            
        myArray = null;

        GC.Collect();
        GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();
        Console.WriteLine(TestDestructor.DestructorCalled);
        Console.In.ReadToEnd();
    }

    private static void NewMethod()
    {
        TestDestructor testDestructor = new TestDestructor() { xy = "foo" };
        testDestructor.testList.Add("bar");
        myArray = new object[] { testDestructor };
        Console.WriteLine(myArray.Length);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is strange, especially considering Jon Skeet's answer, since the non-volatile optimization bugs occur in Release mode. –  Tudor Nov 11 '11 at 8:52
    
Debug mode holds the variables and objects longer (till the end of the method) so they can be inspected with the debugger. –  Stilgar Nov 11 '11 at 8:55
    
If i run Jon Skeet´s program it fails in Debug, and succeeds in Release. VS 2010 again. –  Jobo Nov 11 '11 at 8:58
    
Indeed strange but true. And so this leads to the question - How do I get the test to pass in debug mode, since that's how we normally run our tests? –  Paul Haley Nov 11 '11 at 9:26
1  
Well the array is out of scope now so this is not surprising. –  Stilgar Nov 11 '11 at 10:47

EDIT: Okay, I'm making some progress on this. There are three binary switches potentialy involved (at least):

  • Whether the code is optimized; i.e. the /o+ or /o- flag on the command line. This seems to make no difference.
  • Whether the code is run in the debugger or not. This seems to make no difference.
  • The level of debug information generated, i.e. the /debug+, /debug- or /debug:full or /debug:pdbonly command line flag. Only /debug+ or /debug:full causes it to fail.

Additionally:

  • If you separate the Main code from the TestDestructor code, you can tell that it's the compilation mode of the Main code which makes the difference
  • As far as I can tell, the IL generated for /debug:pdbonly is the same as for /debug:full within the method itself so it may be a manifest issue...

EDIT: Okay, this is now really weird. If I disassemble the "broken" version and then reassemble it, it works:

ildasm /out:broken.il Program.exe
ilasm broken.il

ilasm has three different debug settings: /DEBUG, /DEBUG=OPT, and /DEBUG=IMPL. Using either of the first two, it fails - using the last, it works. The last is described as enabling JIT optimization, so presumably that's what's making a difference here... although to my mind it should still be able to collect the object either way.


It's possible that this is due to the memory model in terms of DestructorCalled. It's not volatile, so there's no guarantee that the write from the finalizer thread is "seen" by your test thread.

Finalizers certainly are called in this scenario. After making the variable volatile, this standalone equivalent example (which is just simpler for me to run) certainly prints True for me. That's not proof, of course: without volatile the code isn't guaranteed to fail; it's just not guaranteed to work. Can you get your test to fail after making it a volatile variable?

using System;

class TestDestructor
{
    public static volatile bool DestructorCalled;

    ~TestDestructor()
    {
        DestructorCalled = true;
    }
}

class Test
{
    static void Main()
    {
        TestDestructor testDestructor = new TestDestructor();

        var array = new object[] { testDestructor };
        array = null;

        testDestructor = null;

        GC.Collect();
        GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();
        Console.WriteLine(TestDestructor.DestructorCalled);
    }
}

EDIT: I've just seen this fail when built with Visual Studio, but it was fine from the command line. Looking into the IL now...

share|improve this answer
    
@Downvoter: Care to comment? –  Jon Skeet Nov 11 '11 at 8:50
3  
I think SO should force a comment when downvoting. –  Danny Chen Nov 11 '11 at 9:03
1  
It prints true in release mode even if there is no volatile so it seems like your theory is wrong. (BTW I wasn't the one who downvoted :) ) –  Stilgar Nov 11 '11 at 9:15
    
@Stilgar: It might print True - but it's not guaranteed to. That's the point - that's why I said "there's no guarantee". Will edit to clarify a bit. –  Jon Skeet Nov 11 '11 at 9:17
1  
Adding volatile has no effect for me. It still fails in debug mode and passes in release. –  Paul Haley Nov 11 '11 at 9:22

As pointed out by Ani in the comments the whole Array is optimized away in release mode so we should change the code to look like this:

class TestDestructor
{
    public static bool DestructorCalled;
    ~TestDestructor()
    {
        DestructorCalled = true;
    }
}

class Test
{
    static void Main()
    {
        TestDestructor testDestructor = new TestDestructor();

        var array = new object[] { testDestructor };
        Console.WriteLine(array[0].ToString());
        array = null;

        testDestructor = null;

        GC.Collect();
        GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();
        Console.WriteLine(TestDestructor.DestructorCalled);
    }
} 

For me it works (without volatile) and prints True always. Can anyone confirm that the finalizer is not called in release mode because otherwise we can assume it is related to debug mode.

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If I'm not mistaken it's because the object is essentially copied and separate from it's initial creation when loaded into the array. Then when you destroy the array and original object, the object copied to the array still exists.

Garbage Collection should do it's job eventually, but I get that you're trying to force it to clear resources. What I would try is to clear the array first (removing the object) before destroying it, and see if it gets rid of everything.

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Notice that the assert is for the static member, so any one of the two garbage collections should trigger it. The code above should work. –  Tudor Nov 11 '11 at 8:45

That's what documentation says:

Implementing Finalize methods or destructors can have a negative impact on performance and you should avoid using them unnecessarily. Reclaiming the memory used by objects with Finalize methods requires at least two garbage collections. [...] A future garbage collection will determine that the finalized objects are truly garbage because they are no longer pointed to by entries in the list of objects marked as ready for finalization. In this future garbage collection, the objects' memory is actually reclaimed.

Try to use a mechanism of disposing instead of finalizing to see what will happen

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1  
How is that relevant here? –  CodesInChaos Nov 11 '11 at 8:59
    
@CodeInChaos, I don't get what's wrong for you –  Andrey Atapin Nov 11 '11 at 9:06
    
it is relevant because assuming that it needs a couple of GCs to run the finalizers the code should call GC.Collect twice. My experiments show that this does not help. –  Stilgar Nov 11 '11 at 9:13

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