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I'm having a hard time understanding why I am getting a code contract violation on the following piece of code:

     // servicequery is of type System.Data.Services.Client.DataServiceQuery<DividendData>
     // therefore implements IQueryable
     var serviceQuery = CreateDataService().DividendData;
     Contract.Assume(serviceQuery != null);
     Contract.Assume(serviceQuery.Any());
     var data = serviceQuery
        .Select(div => new {I = 2});

The violation is: CodeContracts: requires unproven: constructor != null right on the assignment.

If I change this code to the following, the violation goes away:

  class resulttype
  {
     public int I { get; set; }
  }


  var serviceQuery = CreateDataService().DividendData;
  Contract.Assume(serviceQuery != null);
  Contract.Assume(serviceQuery.Any());
  var data = serviceQuery
     .Select(div => new resulttype() {I = 2});

My question is 'why?'.

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Could you provide the exception stack trace? Which of the 2 assignments throws it? –  Pavel Gatilov Dec 1 '11 at 19:42
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1 Answer

It seems it need an actual class as a contract. What you can do is:

var serviceQuery = CreateDataService().DividendData;
Contract.Assume(serviceQuery != null);
Contract.Assume(serviceQuery.Any());
var data = serviceQuery.ToList().Select(div => {I = 2});

Anyway, it's very weird what you are doing there...

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Also, it seems you are executing the service twice, maybe you'll want to put the result in a variable and then check if it has elements –  ivowiblo Dec 24 '11 at 3:36
    
So I'm not getting why it's weird either? I am trying to select a subset of data (specific columns only) from the DividendData WCF Data Service. –  Pieter Breed Dec 29 '11 at 8:13
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