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What is the "correct" way to access an object's properties from within an object method that is not a getter/setter method?

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2  
more descrition needed.what you need? –  Android Killer Nov 11 '11 at 9:09
    
If you are looking for something like C++'s friend keyword, Java does not have it. –  S.L. Barth Nov 11 '11 at 9:10
3  
I think the question can be reformulated: Should I use getters and setters when implementing my object methods? Or should I access member variables directly? –  Antoine Nov 11 '11 at 9:15
    
If you are asking about the use of "this" keyword, check stackoverflow.com/questions/725770/…. –  jalopaba Nov 11 '11 at 9:17

4 Answers 4

Getter/Setter is the recommended way of accessing properties of an object. Otherwise you to have to use public properties, but public properties are not recommended.

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This is mostly a matter of preference.

I personally prefer not to use the getters and setters in my object. This increases readability, allows me to change my getters and settings to return copies (of lists mostly) without it changing my own object. If you do something special in your getter then you can make a helper method that is used by both your getter and your other functions. This will go wrong if your classes get too large though (so don't make large classes). I don't like how using a getter setter hides the side effects inside the object (unlike for external users, they should be hidden from any side effects inside the object), when you want to have the side effects, give the private method a clear name indiciting it has them.

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If a classes' properties don't have getters and they are not visible (e.g. not public), that means that the class is designed so that you can't access them. In that case, there is no proper way to access them.

Flipping this around, if you are designing a class and you intend that other classes can access its attributes, you ought to provide getters. You could alternatively declare the attributes to be public, protected or package private, but that makes your abstraction leaky and has a number of undesirable consequences.


If you are asking how one of an object's methods should access its own attributes, the simple answer is whichever way is most convenient. If the class has getters, you could call them. Alternatively, you could just access the attributes directly. The problems of leaky abstraction don't apply in this case because the method accessing the state is inside the abstraction boundary.

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First off I'll answer the question as is:

What is the "correct" way to access an object's properties from within an object method that is not a getter/setter method?

When you are within an object, you can reference the properties directly where the method is part of the object. For example:

public class testClass() {
  public int x;

  private someMethod() {
    x = 4;
  }
}

To answer the comment:

I think the question can be reformulated: Should I use getters and setters when implementing my object methods? Or should I access member variables directly?

You should always hide the internal data and other implementation details within a class as much as possible; seperating the API from the implementation (a.k.a encapsulation). Encapsulation decouples the modules thereby allowing them to be developed, tested and modified in isolation.

Generally, you should use the lowest access modifier possible (e.g. private, protected, package-private) whilst maintaining functionality for the application you're writing. The benefits of designing and devloping this way is that you can change implementation details without breaking code that uses the modules. If you make everything public, and other people are using your classes, you are forced to support it forever maintaining compatibility - or until they change their implementation that is using your modules.

Instance fields should never be public as you give up the ability to limit the values that can be stored in the field, and if it is a mutable object, you open your object up for misuse (see here). It is important to note too that classes with public mutable fields are not thread-safe. It is also important to note that instance fields that are declared public static final but are mutable objects can also be modified and can be a security risk.

Basically, in public classes - always use accessor methods, not public fields. It allows you to protect your mutable objects from modification outside of the class (be it intentionally or unintentionally) and allows you to change implementation detail later without harming your clients.

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