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I am running a local SQL Server server and i am doing a insert query of about 1500 rows and this takes such a long time that im quite amazed really. I have googled and searched in here and found quite many ideas and solutions but still find it to be way to slow, i mean its 1500 rows!

My question is this, is there any other way to do a insert of this amount? Is it really too many rows to insert so i need to load it from a csv file?

My computer is Win7 32bit, 4GB RAM, Core2Duo 1.86GHZ SQL Server Version 10.50.1617

First query

USE CustomerDB;

IF OBJECT_ID('Customer', 'U') IS NOT NULL
DROP TABLE Customer;

CREATE TABLE Customer
( 
CustomerID int PRIMARY KEY IDENTITY,
CustomerName nvarchar(16),
...about 130 more columns...
);

INSERT INTO Customer VALUES
('FirstCustomerName', ...),
...1500 more rows...
('LastCustomerName', ...)

After well over 10minutes and still not finished i stopped query since this is obviously wrong.

Second query:

USE CustomerDB;

IF OBJECT_ID('Customer', 'U') IS NOT NULL
DROP TABLE Customer;

CREATE TABLE Customer
( 
CustomerID int PRIMARY KEY IDENTITY,
CustomerName nvarchar(16),
...about 130 more columns...
);

INSERT INTO Customer VALUES
('FirstCustomerName', ...);
INSERT INTO Customer VALUES
('SecondCustomerName', ...);
...1500 more ...
INSERT INTO Customer VALUES
('LastCustomerName', ...);

Ok, down to 6.5seconds, much better but this still feels very slow for 1500rows

Third query:

USE CustomerDB;

IF OBJECT_ID('Customer', 'U') IS NOT NULL
DROP TABLE Customer;

begin transaction Insert;

CREATE TABLE Customer
( 
CustomerID int PRIMARY KEY IDENTITY,
CustomerName nvarchar(16),
...about 130 more columns...
);

INSERT INTO Customer VALUES
('FirstCustomerName', ...);
INSERT INTO Customer VALUES
('SecondCustomerName', ...);
...1500 more ...
INSERT INTO Customer VALUES
('LastCustomerName', ...);

commit transaction Insert;

Ok, down to 4.5-5 seconds, even better but still kinda slow i think

Im not a DB/SQL Server guru so this is as far as i have come on my own, help would be appreciated!

Edit: Since I'm no guru, is 4.5 seconds considered to be a ok amount of time on a normal pc running sql server for a 1500 row insert?

share|improve this question
    
What is the size of the data you are inserting? Any triggers on the table? –  Martin Smith Nov 11 '11 at 11:50
    
@Martin Smith Im not sure what you mean with size, but if i save the query in a textfile its 900kb, no triggers on the table –  Andreas Nov 11 '11 at 11:58
    
@MartinSmith If i look at the table properties after the insert it says "Data space 1,070 MB" –  Andreas Nov 11 '11 at 12:08
    
Have you tried a BULK_INSERT from a comma separated data file (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms188365.aspx)? –  Miika L. Nov 11 '11 at 12:23
    
@MiikaL. No i havent tried that, wanted to know if there was anything else i could do before going that way. As i posted in question i wanted to know if 1500 rows is too big to insert in a reasonable amount of time –  Andreas Nov 11 '11 at 12:29

5 Answers 5

This insert is slow because your adding 1 row at a time and it's fully logged. The bottleneck is not writing the data, it's writing what you're doing in the log.

Get rid of the row by row insert and insert the set with a table lock:

INSERT TABLENAME WITH(TABLOCK) (Column1,Column2,...)
 SELECT 'Column1Row1Value','Column2Row1Value'...
 UNION ALL
 SELECT 'Column1Row2value','Column2Row2Value'...
 UNION ALL
 SELECT 'Column1Row3value','Column2Row3Value'...

Also, look into the rules of minimally logged transactions.

share|improve this answer
1  
Also, if you want a minimally logged INSERT into a non-empty clustered table, you have to enable trace flag 610. –  Gonsalu Nov 12 '11 at 18:04
    
This won't be treated any differently than having multiple chained VALUES clauses as per Derrick's answer and the OP's first example. –  Martin Smith Nov 13 '11 at 9:03
    
Martin you may be correct. I haven't tested. However, msdn makes no mention of minimal logging for INSERT INTO...VALUES statements, only INSERT INTO...SELECT: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms174335.aspx See the section "Using INSERT INTO…SELECT to Bulk Import Data with Minimal Logging". I'd be curious to see a test of this though. –  brian Nov 15 '11 at 14:37
    
+1 Gonsalu. I did mention the rules of minimally logged transactions and trace flag 610 is certainly one if there is a clustered index. "Whether an INSERT… SELECT operation into clustered indexes is minimally logged or not depends on the state of trace flag 610. INSERT…SELECT operations into heaps can be minimally logged even without trace flag 610." msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd425070%28v=sql.100%29.aspx –  brian Nov 15 '11 at 14:48
    
@brian I did a query like how you said, 100 rows took 6.8second to insert... –  Andreas Nov 17 '11 at 10:30

Rather than doing individual insert statements you'll most likely want to do a union like this:

INSERT INTO Customer 
SELECT 'FirstCustomerName', ...
UNION
SELECT '2ndCustomerName', ...
UNION
SELECT '3rdCustomerName', ...
...1500 more rows...

This should be much faster.

share|improve this answer
    
This won't be treated any differently than having multiple chained VALUES clauses as per Derrick's answer and the OP's first example (and should use UNION ALL) –  Martin Smith Nov 13 '11 at 9:04
    
I tested it and it ran much faster than the OP's example (I set up a test case for that too). UNION ALL is certainly an alternative if all the data is known to be unique. –  Chris Townsend Nov 14 '11 at 11:58
    
Looks like you were testing the OP's second case. The first case is all a single statement and is algebrised exactly the same as with UNION ALL. UNION ALL is the correct thing to use as if the data is not known to be unique you have changed the semantics anyway. –  Martin Smith Nov 14 '11 at 12:09
    
Using UNION instead of UNION ALL may incur the cost of sorting. –  kerem Apr 19 '12 at 13:02

Do you have some Indexes on the table? They slow down the insert statements because the index-table would be refreshed after every insert statement.

share|improve this answer
    
As i said im no guru at MSSQL so i dont know how to check this, would you tell me how to do it i will –  Andreas Nov 11 '11 at 9:39
    
You can show your Indexes with show indexes from TABLENAME. For a detailed Illustration dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/show-index.html –  matzino Nov 11 '11 at 9:46
    
It had one index on the CustomerID, removed it but query still takes 4.5-5seconds –  Andreas Nov 11 '11 at 10:18
    
Very good suggestion. You'll likely want to add the index back after the large insert, however. –  Derrick Nov 11 '11 at 12:14

Have a look at Performance Monitor in SQL Management Studio while you run the insert. This might point you in the right direction.

130 columns is pretty wide (depending on the individual field types and sizes). It might be an overhead associated with SQL Server having to manage and reallocate pages as you insert (page splitting). Performance Monitor (or run a trace) will help identify if this is the case.

share|improve this answer
    
I didnt not find any information when running a trace, but i created a table with only customer name and customerID counter and inserted 1500 rows in 0.6 to 1second. So i guess the size of my table is so big that its causing the query to be slow, so there is nothing more i can do to speed this up except upgrade hardware? –  Andreas Nov 11 '11 at 11:57

There's an alternate insert format that you could try. However, I'm not sure if it actually performs better.

INSERT INTO table_name
VALUES
 (100, 'Name 1', 'Value 1', 'Other 1'),
 (101, 'Name 2', 'Value 2', 'Other 2'),
 (102, 'Name 3', 'Value 3', 'Other 3'),
 (103, 'Name 4', 'Value 4', 'Other 4');

reference: http://www.electrictoolbox.com/mysql-insert-multiple-records/

share|improve this answer
    
As you can see in my first query this is exactly what i did –  Andreas Nov 11 '11 at 12:14
    
@MartinSmith Well...the very first query that i abort after 10+ minutes running is formatted like this –  Andreas Nov 11 '11 at 12:24
    
@MartinSmith I renamed it to "First query" in post, the insert format sure looks the same to me.. –  Andreas Nov 11 '11 at 12:28
    
Ah, I see it now! I too overlooked that (obviously). –  Derrick Nov 11 '11 at 13:50

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