Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to think of a good way to model the company objects in a new project. A company on it's on already has a lot of data: office address(es), telephone numbers, email addresses, employees (which also have multiple roles: project member, sales representative, etc) and you name it. Now, when it comes to relationships, a company can do business with another company. Often a company buys or sells to another company. But it can also be a two-way situation in which both companies buy and sell from and to eachother. I want to model these relationships in a model which can handle these situations. Besides that, I have a need to be able to add companies to my administration which I haven't done any business with yet, just a relationship. I don't want to fill in all the debtor details yet, or give them a debtor number. Before the become a debtor, the will become a lead first. I don't want lose classes, because I don't want to replicate all the data. Personel and Contactinformation for instance does not change if I start selling or buying from another company.

My question is: how can I model company so they can have multiple roles? Some pseudo code or class diagram would be nice!

Thanks in advance for trying to help me on my way.

Regards, Ted

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There are many ways to skin this particular cat and making a recommendation really requires access to the requirements of your system in detail plus enough time to consider the options. However, assuming that these relationships cannot be derived (see last paragraph), I would, perhaps, consider something like the following:-

public class Company
{
    public string Name { get; set; }        
    public IEnumerable<Relationship>
    {
        get { ... }
    }
}

public class Relationship
{
    public RelationshipType { get; set; }
    public Company { get; set; }
}

public enum RelationshipType
{
    Other,
    Debtor,
    Creditor,
    Lead,
}

This is assuming that the differences between the relationships are trivial as far as your OO model is concerned. If, however, you require behaviors from your relationships specific to the type, then I would consider subtyping, e.g.:-

public class Relationship
{
    public Company { get; set; }
    public virtual void Foo()
    {
        ....
    }
}

public class Debtor : Relationship
{
    public override void Foo()
    {
        ....
    }
}

public class Creditor : Relationship
{
    public override void Foo()
    {
        ....
    }
}

public class Lead : Relationship
{
    public override void Foo()
    {
        ....
    }
}

Another thing to consider is that these relationships are, ultimately, derivations of interactions between the companies. E.g. a company X is a debtor of company Y if and only if company X owes money to company Y. Is this information contained in your system? If so, do you really want to de-normalize that information or would it be better to derive this on the fly? If this information is external to your system and your system is designed specifically to hold a de-normalization of these facts then you can ignore this paragraph.

share|improve this answer
    
+1, very good answer based on available info! –  rich.okelly Nov 11 '11 at 10:40
    
I'm not really sure if I like the fact that the relationship class only refers to one end of the relationship. To me it seems likely that one would want to query the relationship both ways (who are my my debtors and to whom am I debtor), which might become difficult if modelled this way. But this is difficult to judge given my knowledge of the requirements. –  Marijn Nov 11 '11 at 23:33
1  
@Marijn: agreed - it may be better to use a true Accountability model. The two way relationship could still be maintained using my model if the the update of creditors and debtors were synchronised on both side of the relationships. I.e. add X as a creditor of Y and add Y as a debtor of X but that could be a little bug prone. –  Adam Ralph Nov 12 '11 at 12:53

I think you are looking for the Accountability and Party concepts. Parties can be companies, but also employees. Two parties can be linked by an accountability. This accountability describes the kind of relationship between the parties. Using these concepts, you can model multiple links of different types between parties of different types.

This actually is an analysis pattern described by Fowler in this article on accountability.

share|improve this answer
    
That's a very good article, but I think the concept required here is Accountability rather than Party? I don't see any need to subtype or the Company type or replace it with a general Party type but I do see the need to represent different types of relationships between them. I think my answer is effectively demonstrating a variant of the Accountability pattern but using the term 'Relationship' instead of 'Accountability'. The only real difference is that the parent is defined by the owner of the IEnumerable<Relationship> rather than by a member of a Relationship object. –  Adam Ralph Nov 11 '11 at 16:58
    
You are right, I changed my answer to put more emphasis on the accountability concept. –  Marijn Nov 11 '11 at 23:25
    
We have the book in our office. I've read parts of it. Do you have some example code or a class diagram of how to model it in C#? –  TedOnTheNet Nov 22 '11 at 13:36
    
The book is from Fowler's pre-uml era and so all diagrams are in the form of entity relationship diagrams, using crow's foot notation. The link in my answer points to the same text, but a newer version with UML diagrams. HTH. ATM, I'm not aware of an example implementation in C#. –  Marijn Nov 22 '11 at 13:45

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.