Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am running a C# application that references a C++\CLI wrapper project which in turn references a native c++ project dependent on Boost 1.47 library (links to files of the form ...vc100-mt-gd-1_47.lib)

All libraries are statically linked and everything compiles great. Executing the C# app results in an exception: "...is not a valid Win32 application. (Exception from HRESULT: 0x800700C1)." claiming some dependency is missing somewhere.

C# application is configured to x86 platform while all other projects are Win32, including boost's binaries.

EDIT: before adding the use of Boost library, it DID work

How can I track down the problem?

share|improve this question
    
It is not a missing dependency kind of error. Has to be the platform target setting. –  Hans Passant Nov 11 '11 at 13:08
    
eventhough it is stated as such in the error description? –  Leo Nov 11 '11 at 13:30
2  
Maybe AnyCPU is the proper setting, hard to guess from your description. Use SysInternals' ProcMon.exe tool to verify your assumptions. You'll see it loading any DLLs that you might not necessary assume to be a dependency for the native code. A 64-bit native DLL will trigger this exception when the platform target is x86. –  Hans Passant Nov 11 '11 at 13:37
    
What details can I supply to help? Also, note the edit about boost being the cause –  Leo Nov 11 '11 at 14:26
2  
@Seth, yes I have. I am not sure why this happens, but when a CLR project references a native project that uses boost, the boost libraries must be dynamically linked. static linkage fails for some reason. –  Leo Mar 7 '12 at 9:26
show 8 more comments

2 Answers 2

Came across this nasty error the other day whilst trying to get an IIS app running on my Visat 64bit PC:

Error: Is not a valid Win32 application. (Exception from HRESULT: 0x800700C1)

Solution:

Within IIS 7 click on Application Pools (left hand side under {machine_name}) Select your app pool and then click Advanced Settings on the right. Second setting in the list: Enable 32-Bit Applications - must be set to True.

share|improve this answer
add comment

It is known issue. The reason is Thread Local Storage (TLS) used in the Boost::Thread. To fix it you should either disable libboost_thread-vcXXX-mt-1_XX.lib and force linker to link your C++/CLI assembly with boost_thread-vcXXX-mt-1_XX.lib (stub of the boost_thread-vcXXX-mt-1_XX.dll).

Or you can create your own DLL and link it with libboost_thread-vcXXX-mt-1_XX.lib. Then you can link your C++ DLL with C++/CLI assembly.

See

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.