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I'm using the following code to show a particular UITableView: the first row must show an icon, all the "inner" rows a different one and, at the end, there's another icon. So, we have three icons, one for the top cell, one for the "inner" cells, and one for the bottom cell.

- (UITableViewCell *)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath{
    UITableViewCell *cell = [self.tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:@"cell"];

    if (cell == nil) 
    {
        cell = [[[UITableViewCell alloc] initWithStyle:UITableViewCellStyleDefault reuseIdentifier:@"cell"]autorelease];
        cell.accessoryType = UITableViewCellAccessoryDisclosureIndicator;   
    }

    TabBarTestAppDelegate *delegate = (TabBarTestAppDelegate *)[[UIApplication sharedApplication] delegate];
    NSArray *local = delegate.myData;
    // ok, it's horrible, don't look at it   :-)
    cell.textLabel.text = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@%@", @"       " ,[local objectAtIndex:indexPath.row]];
    //
    NSString* name;
    if (indexPath.row == 0) {
        name = @"topicon";
    }
    else if (indexPath.row + 1 == [local count]) {
        name = @"bottomicon";
    }
    else {
        name = @"innericon";
    }
    //
    UIImage *leftIcon = [[UIImage alloc] initWithContentsOfFile: [[NSBundle mainBundle] pathForResource:name ofType:@"png"]];
    //
    UIImageView *imageView = [[UIImageView alloc] initWithImage:leftIcon];
    [cell addSubview:imageView];
    imageView.frame = CGRectMake(20,0,30,44);
    [leftIcon release];
    [imageView release[;

    return cell;
}

What happens. The first time the UITableView is loaded by the simulator there's apparently no problem, but, after scrolling, it happens something strange: the first and the last cell show the right icon AND, underneath, another icon. The icon under the bottom and the top icon is an "inner" icon, that should appear only when indexPath.row!=0 or indexPath.row+1!=[local count]. Frankly, I don't know if every other icon gets duplicated while scrolling, but this effect is quite visible.

I imagined there could be some issue with the subview, but, being an objective-C newbie, I can't imagine exactly what.

Any help is appreciated.

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1  
That's going to be a lot faster if you use UIImage imageNamed: instead initWithContentsOfFile because the UIImage already looks up the filename in your main bundle and adds the result to a cache. –  Jano Nov 11 '11 at 11:54

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Well the TableView is reusing the cells, and you add the image every time a cell is displaid. Thus when reusing the cell you add an other image, but there already is an image.

You will have to reuse the image view, and only add the image if you create the cell.

- (UITableViewCell *)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath{
    static NSString *cellIdentifer = @"cell";

    UITableViewCell *cell = [tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:cellIdentifer];

    if (cell == nil) 
    {
        cell = [[[UITableViewCell alloc] initWithStyle:UITableViewCellStyleDefault reuseIdentifier:cellIdentifer]autorelease];
        cell.accessoryType = UITableViewCellAccessoryDisclosureIndicator;   


        UIImageView *imageView = [[UIImageView alloc] initWithFrame:CGRectMake(20,0,30,44)];
        imageView.tag = 1001;
        [cell addSubview:imageView];
        [imageView release], imageView= nil;
    }

    TabBarTestAppDelegate *delegate = (TabBarTestAppDelegate *)[[UIApplication sharedApplication] delegate];
    NSArray *local = delegate.myData;
    // ok, it's horrible, don't look at it   :-)
    cell.textLabel.text = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@%@", @"       " ,[local objectAtIndex:indexPath.row]];
    //

    NSString* name = nil;;
    if (indexPath.row == 0) {
        name = @"topicon";
    }
    else if (indexPath.row + 1 == [local count]) {
        name = @"bottomicon";
    }
    else {
        name = @"innericon";
    }

    UIImageView *imageView = (UIImageView *)[cell viewWithTag:1001];
    imageView.image = [UIImage imageWithContentsOfFile: [[NSBundle mainBundle] pathForResource:name ofType:@"png"]];

    return cell;
 }
share|improve this answer
    
I thought about this, but I don't know how to do it. A little tip? :-) Move all the affected code inside the body of if(cell==nil)? –  AsTheWormTurns Nov 11 '11 at 11:29
    
I've added some code for you ;) –  rckoenes Nov 11 '11 at 11:32
    
Wow, thanks, it perfecly works: now I must absolutely study your code! ;-) –  AsTheWormTurns Nov 11 '11 at 12:04

The best option is to create a custom cell with the necessary details. Sample

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Thanks for the sample, I'll give it a look. –  AsTheWormTurns Nov 11 '11 at 12:05

One thing. Don't add new imageviews again and again. Try to reuse them. I have given a simple example for reusing components inside a cell , in my post here.

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I am adding a solution to this because I've been beating my head against this for a little while, and most of the answers here are 2-3 years old, and there's a much better way now to solve this...

In the Storyboard editor, you can drag more than one prototype cell into your UITableView, and give them different reuse Identifiers, ike this:

enter image description here

if ( specialCase ) {
    UIColor *color = [UIColor colorWithRed:0.2 green:(0.8) blue:0.2 alpha:1.0];
    cell = [tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:@"TopCellGreen" forIndexPath:indexPath];
    cell.textColor = color;
} else {
    cell = [tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:@"TopCell"  forIndexPath:indexPath];
}

Note the different identifiers. This will prevent your customizations (green text) from showing up randomly in other cells that [re]use the same cell.

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Had a similar problem. I needed to add an image to the last cell of my table, the one with indexPath.row set to 15.

So i used the trick shown above by Glenn (tnx a lot!), ending up with something like this:

NSString *CellIdentifier = @"Cell";
if (indexPath.row==15)
    CellIdentifier=@"CamCell";
NuovaSegnalazioneCell *cell = (NuovaSegnalazioneCell *)[tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:CellIdentifier];
if(cell == nil){
    cell = [[NuovaSegnalazioneCell alloc] initWithStyle:UITableViewCellStyleValue1 reuseIdentifier:CellIdentifier];
    cell.detailTextField.delegate = self;
    NSLog(@"INIT CELL %d",indexPath.row);
}

This way the 15th cell has a different CellIdentifier and it isn't re-used anywhere else while scrolling the table.

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