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i tried to run this script :

for line in $(cat song.txt)
do echo "$line" >> out.txt
done

running it on ubuntu 11.04

when "song.txt" contains :

I read the news today oh boy
About a lucky man who made the grade

after running the script the "out.txt" looks like that:

I
read
the
news
today
oh
boy
About
a
lucky
man
who
made
the
grade

is anyone can tell me what i am doing wrong here?

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What's the difference between the two lines? –  Didier Trosset Nov 11 '11 at 11:43
    
it prints each word in new line instead of print each line in new line –  0x90 Nov 11 '11 at 11:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

For per-line input you should use while read, for example:

cat song.txt | while read line
do
    echo "$line" >> out.txt
done

Better (more efficient really) would be the following method:

while read line
do
    echo "$line"
done < song.txt > out.txt
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2  
more efficient to do the redirection outside of the while loop: ... | while read line; do echo "$line"; done > out.txt –  glenn jackman Nov 11 '11 at 15:34
    
@glenn maybe, can't see much difference for this particular case though –  Matvey Aksenov Nov 11 '11 at 20:28

That's because of the for command that takes every word from the list it is given (in your case, the content of the song.txt file), whether the words are separated by spaces or newline characters.

What's misguiding you here, is that your for variable name is line. for only works with words. Reread your script changing line by word and it should make sense.

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In the for-each-in loop the list that is specified is assumed to be white-space separated. A white-space includes a space, new-line, tab etc. In your case the list is the entire text of the file and hence, the loop runs for every word in the file.

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