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I am looking for a function in Numpy or Scipy (or any rigorous Python library) that will give me the cumulative normal distribution function in Python. This is for Black Scholes option pricing. I can program it myself but it is a (decent) approximation and I'd like to test if there's something (even) better as as I still get a few decimals of error which I'd like to reduce?

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5 Answers 5

Here's an example:

>>> from scipy.stats import norm
>>> norm.cdf(1.96)
array(0.97500210485177952)

If you need the inverse CDF:

>>> norm.ppf(norm.cdf(1.96))
array(1.9599999999999991)
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3  
+1. Also, the original author of scipy.stats offers a related set of functions in a module called pstat.py: nmr.mgh.harvard.edu/Neural_Systems_Group/strang/python.html –  Jarret Hardie Apr 30 '09 at 22:50
2  
Also, you can specify the mean (loc) and variance (scale) as parameters. e.g, d = norm(loc=10.0, scale=2.0); d.cdf(12.0); Details here: docs.scipy.org/doc/scipy-0.14.0/reference/generated/… –  Irvan Oct 31 '14 at 13:41
    
@Irvan, the scale parameter is actually the standard deviation, NOT the variance. –  qkhhly Jun 2 at 19:08

Adapted from here http://mail.python.org/pipermail/python-list/2000-June/039873.html

from math import *
def erfcc(x):
    """Complementary error function."""
    z = abs(x)
    t = 1. / (1. + 0.5*z)
    r = t * exp(-z*z-1.26551223+t*(1.00002368+t*(.37409196+
    	t*(.09678418+t*(-.18628806+t*(.27886807+
    	t*(-1.13520398+t*(1.48851587+t*(-.82215223+
    	t*.17087277)))))))))
    if (x >= 0.):
    	return r
    else:
    	return 2. - r

def ncdf(x):
    return 1. - 0.5*erfcc(x/(2**0.5))
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To build upon Unknown's example, the Python equivalent of the function normdist() implemented in a lot of libraries would be:

def normcdf(x, mu, sigma):
    t = x-mu;
    y = 0.5*erfcc(-t/(sigma*sqrt(2.0)));
    if y>1.0:
        y = 1.0;
    return y

def normpdf(x, mu, sigma):
    u = (x-mu)/abs(sigma)
    y = (1/(sqrt(2*pi)*abs(sigma)))*exp(-u*u/2)
    return y

def normdist(x, mu, sigma, f):
    if f:
        y = normcdf(x,mu,sigma)
    else:
        y = normpdf(x,mu,sigma)
    return y
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It may be too late to answer the question but since Google still leads people here, I decide to write my solution here.

That is, since Python 2.7, the math library has integrated the error function math.erf(x)

The erf() function can be used to compute traditional statistical functions such as the cumulative standard normal distribution:

from math import *
def phi(x):
    #'Cumulative distribution function for the standard normal distribution'
    return (1.0 + erf(x / sqrt(2.0))) / 2.0

Ref:

https://docs.python.org/2/library/math.html

https://docs.python.org/3/library/math.html

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As Google gives this answer for the search netlogo pdf, here's the netlogo version of the above python code


    ;; Normal distribution cumulative density function
    to-report normcdf [x mu sigma]
        let t x - mu
        let y 0.5 * erfcc [ - t / ( sigma * sqrt 2.0)]
        if ( y > 1.0 ) [ set y 1.0 ]
        report y
    end

    ;; Normal distribution probability density function
    to-report normpdf [x mu sigma]
        let u = (x - mu) / abs sigma
        let y = 1 / ( sqrt [2 * pi] * abs sigma ) * exp ( - u * u / 2.0)
        report y
    end

    ;; Complementary error function
    to-report erfcc [x]
        let z abs x
        let t 1.0 / (1.0 + 0.5 * z)
        let r t *  exp ( - z * z -1.26551223 + t * (1.00002368 + t * (0.37409196 +
            t * (0.09678418 + t * (-0.18628806 + t * (.27886807 +
            t * (-1.13520398 +t * (1.48851587 +t * (-0.82215223 +
            t * .17087277 )))))))))
        ifelse (x >= 0) [ report r ] [report 2.0 - r]
    end

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4  
The question is about Python, not NetLogo. This answer should not be here. And please don't edit the question to change its meaning. –  interjay Oct 18 '12 at 13:07
    
I am aware that this is not the preferred way, but I guess it is most helpful this way as people are directed to this page by google (currently...) –  platipodium Oct 18 '12 at 13:19

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