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I understand optional parameters, and I quite like them, but I'd just like to know a bit more about using them with an inherited interface.

Exhibit A

interface IMyInterface
{
    string Get();
    string Get(string str);
}

class MyClass : IMyInterface
{
    public string Get(string str = null)
    {
        return str;
    }
}

Now I would've thought that the Get method in MyClass inherits both of the interface's methods, but...

'MyClass' does not implement interface member 'MyInterface.Get()'

Is there a good reason for this?

Perhaps I should go about this by putting the optional parameters in the interface you say? But what about this?

Exhibit B

interface IMyInterface
{
    string Get(string str= "Default");
}

class MyClass : IMyInterface
{
    public string Get(string str = "A different string!")
    {
        return str;
    }
}

And this code compiles fine. But that can't be right surely? Then with a bit more digging, I discovered this:

  IMyInterface obj = new MyClass();
  Console.WriteLine(obj.Get()); // writes "Default"

  MyClass cls = new MyClass();
  Console.WriteLine(cls.Get()); // writes "A different string!"

It would seem to be that the calling code is getting the value of the optional parameter based on the objects declared type, then passing it to the method. This, to me, seems a bit daft. Maybe optional parameters and method overloads both have their scenarios when they should be used?

My question

My calling code being passed an instance of IMyInterface and needs to call both methods here at different points.

Will I be forced to implement the same method overload in every implementation?

public string Get()
{
  return Get("Default");
}
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5  
See Eric Lippert's Optional argument corner cases, part two –  Ani Nov 11 '11 at 13:29
    
Nice link, cheers –  Connell Watkins Nov 11 '11 at 13:31
1  
+1 This tells me never to define interfaces with optional parameters. Too much ambiguity. –  Gert Arnold Nov 11 '11 at 16:14
    
@GertArnold Since the question, I've found out a bit more. I think I'll post it as an answer to the question because I did actually find a solution. –  Connell Watkins Nov 11 '11 at 16:17
1  
I really don't think default parameters should be allowed on interfaces. They are an implementation detail. –  Igby Largeman Nov 11 '11 at 16:45
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

What I also didn't realise, is that optional parameters don't change the method signature. So the following code is perfectly legal and was actually my solution:

interface IMyInterface
{
    string Get(string str = "Default");
}

class MyClass : IMyInterface
{
    public string Get(string str)
    {
        return str;
    }
}

So if I have an instance of MyClass, I must call Get(string str), but if that instance has been declared as the base interface IMyInterface, I can still call Get(), which gets the default value from IMyInterface first, then invokes the method.

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1  
Consider that you could also have public string Get(string whateverIWant). Some parts of the the interface are promises (it promises to take a string and return a string), some are hints (it suggests letting the calling code leave out the parameter, and have the compiler change it to a call with "Default") and some are documentation (the name of the parameter matters not unless called by name). –  Jon Hanna Nov 11 '11 at 16:29
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