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I'm considering a type erasure setup that uses typeid to resolve the type like so...

struct BaseThing
{
    virtual ~BaseThing() = 0 {}
};

template<typename T>
struct Thing : public BaseThing
{
    T x;
};

struct A{};
struct B{};

int main() 
{
    BaseThing* pThing = new Thing<B>();
    const std::type_info& x = typeid(*pThing);

    if( x == typeid(Thing<B>))
    {
        std::cout << "pThing is a Thing<B>!\n";
        Thing<B>* pB = static_cast<Thing<B>*>(pThing);
    }
    else if( x == typeid(Thing<A>))
    {
        std::cout << "pThing is a Thing<A>!\n";
        Thing<A>* pA = static_cast<Thing<A>*>(pThing);
    }
}

I've never seen anyone else do this. The alternative would be for BaseThing to have a pure virtual GetID() which would be used to deduce the type instead of using typeid. In this situation, with only 1 level of inheritance, what's the cost of typeid vs the cost of a virtual function call? I know typeid uses the vtable somehow, but how exactly does it work?

This would be desirable instead of GetID() because it takes quite a bit of hackery to try to make sure the IDs are unique and deterministic.

share|improve this question
3  
Originally, virtual inheritance was designed to avoid just the kind of switch or if-else-chain you are having in your main function. This switch is horribly error prone if someone forgets to add an else. Are you perfectly sure virtual dispatch or double dispatch won't do the job in your case? – thiton Nov 11 '11 at 13:45
1  
Boost.Any uses typeid (in combination with static_cast) alright. User code uses the get function though, and doesn't bother with typeid. - Actually you might just as well use it, instead of rolling your own, as it does more for you (cloning and managing dynamic memory). – visitor Nov 11 '11 at 14:08
    
@thiton Consider most of the event handler methods in the world today - they almost all have a switch or if/else chain equivalent to the above. – David Nov 11 '11 at 14:12
    
@visitor Boost.Any looks perfect, except it's not updated for rvalue references, it could benefit from a make_any the way shared_ptr has a make_shared, and any_cast doesn't properly replace dynamic_cast (see celtschk's answer below for why). – David Nov 11 '11 at 19:15
    
@Dave: I don't get the point about dynamic_cast. There are no intermediate types in Boost.Any. – UncleBens Nov 12 '11 at 13:03
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Typically, you don't just want to know the type, but also do something with the object as that type. In that case, dynamic_cast is more useful:

int main() 
{
    BaseThing* pThing = new Thing<B>();

    if(Thing<B>* pThingB = dynamic_cast<Thing<B>*>(pThing)) {
    {
        // Do something with pThingB
    }
    else if(Thing<A>* pThingA = dynamic_cast<Thing<A>*>(pThing)) {
    {
        // Do something with pThingA
    }
}

I think this is why you rarely see typeid used in practice.

Update:

Since this question concerns performance. I ran some benchmarks on g++ 4.5.1. With this code:

struct Base {
  virtual ~Base() { }
  virtual int id() const = 0;
};

template <class T> struct Id;

template<> struct Id<int> { static const int value = 1; };
template<> struct Id<float> { static const int value = 2; };
template<> struct Id<char> { static const int value = 3; };
template<> struct Id<unsigned long> { static const int value = 4; };

template <class T>
struct Derived : Base {
  virtual int id() const { return Id<T>::value; }
};

static const int count = 100000000;

static int test1(Base *bp)
{
  int total = 0;
  for (int iter=0; iter!=count; ++iter) {
    if (Derived<int>* dp = dynamic_cast<Derived<int>*>(bp)) {
      total += 5;
    }
    else if (Derived<float> *dp = dynamic_cast<Derived<float>*>(bp)) {
      total += 7;
    }
    else if (Derived<char> *dp = dynamic_cast<Derived<char>*>(bp)) {
      total += 2;
    }
    else if (
      Derived<unsigned long> *dp = dynamic_cast<Derived<unsigned long>*>(bp)
    ) {
      total += 9;
    }
  }
  return total;
}

static int test2(Base *bp)
{
  int total = 0;
  for (int iter=0; iter!=count; ++iter) {
    const std::type_info& type = typeid(*bp);

    if (type==typeid(Derived<int>)) {
      total += 5;
    }
    else if (type==typeid(Derived<float>)) {
      total += 7;
    }
    else if (type==typeid(Derived<char>)) {
      total += 2;
    }
    else if (type==typeid(Derived<unsigned long>)) {
      total += 9;
    }
  }
  return total;
}

static int test3(Base *bp)
{
  int total = 0;
  for (int iter=0; iter!=count; ++iter) {
    int id = bp->id();
    switch (id) {
      case 1: total += 5; break;
      case 2: total += 7; break;
      case 3: total += 2; break;
      case 4: total += 9; break;
    }
  }
  return total;
}

Without optimization, I got these runtimes:

test1: 2.277s
test2: 0.629s
test3: 0.469s

With optimization -O2, I got these runtimes:

test1: 0.118s
test2: 0.220s
test3: 0.290s

So it appears that dynamic_cast is the fastest method when using optimization with this compiler.

share|improve this answer
    
I wouldn't need to use dynamic cast if I knew the type though - So in the first if I would do: Thing<B>* pB = static_cast<Thing<B>*>(pThing);. Using typeid and static_cast would be a lot faster than n dynamic_casts. – David Nov 11 '11 at 14:09
    
@Dave Why should typeid be faster than dynamic_cast? Of course in your case you know the type (because of the typeid), but once dynamic_cast returns non-0 (or doesn't throw) you know the type, too and already got your cast. – Christian Rau Nov 11 '11 at 14:13
    
According to visitor (commenter of the main question) what I just said is how Boost.Any does it, heh. typeid would be faster because you only do it once instead of n times. – David Nov 11 '11 at 14:13
    
@Dave Ah, I missed that. Good point. – Christian Rau Nov 11 '11 at 14:15
    
@Dave: Yes, if there are a lot of cases and performance is an issue, I see your point. – Vaughn Cato Nov 11 '11 at 14:29

In almost all cases you don't want the exact type, but you want to make sure that it's of the given type or any type derived from it. If an object of a type derived from it cannot be substituted for an object of the type in question, then you are violating the Liskov Substitution Principle which is one of the most fundamental rules of proper OO design.

share|improve this answer
    
Very good point, +1 – David Nov 11 '11 at 16:42

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