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I guess I am looking for some kind of Intro and see if anybody have used it. Are there any particular advantages of using it?

Wikipedia: "domain-specific language (DSL) is a programming language or specification language dedicated to a particular problem domain, a particular problem representation technique, and/or a particular solution technique."

Can anybody give any specific examples of how you have implemented or how it can be useful in a given scenario?

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what do you mean by "domain specific language"? –  dusoft Apr 30 '09 at 23:33
    
Actually domain specific language is a term with a well defined meaning in programming - check the wikipedia article –  1800 INFORMATION Apr 30 '09 at 23:43
    
AS noted below, DSL is not one language, but the name of a whole class of special purpose languages. –  dmckee Apr 30 '09 at 23:49
    
So can I say R is a DSL? –  Srikar Doddi May 1 '09 at 1:58
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On the edge of it, but I wouldn't. R has all the general purpose structures and is used for a wide range of computations; numeric computations and statistics isn't a very nrrow domain. It's a good test of the definition though. –  Charlie Martin May 1 '09 at 2:18
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6 Answers

up vote 19 down vote accepted

A domain specific language is a language that's written to deal witha specific domain or set of concerns. There are a lot of them around, like make, ant, and rake for describing software builds, or lexx and yacc for language construction. In recent years, they've become popular as some things have combined to make them easier to build. Big among those things has been the increasing popularity of Ruby, which has several features that make it easy to build new DSLs.

Martin Fowler is a big proponent of the idea, as here.

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I'd love to know what the downvote was for... –  Charlie Martin May 1 '09 at 0:13
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What features does Ruby have which make creating a new DSL easier? –  Lernkurve Jul 19 '12 at 8:17
    
@Lernkurve - Ruby had metaprogramming, which helps. rubylearning.com/blog/2010/11/23/… –  James Black Sep 17 '13 at 21:06
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You can think of DSLs as overly complex arguments for functions written in a more general programming language. The real programming language parses the DSL code and does something with it, typically, the DSL code only focuses on the what you want to do, and the larger system figures out the how.

Examples of DSL include all query languages (SQL, XPath, ...), all template languages (Django, Smarty, ...), shell scripts, especially including stuff like twill, a command driven web browser (mostly used for automated test), data storage and exchange languages (XML, YAML, ...), and document languages like LaTex, HTML or CSS.

Some languages with very flexible syntax like TCL and Lisp build their DSL directly into the language... when possible. The majority of languages use strings, usually loaded from external files.

Are there any particular advantages of using them? Using them for their intended purposes is very advantageous to the point you will turn to them without knowing, just like you have been using (I presume) SQL or HTML without thinking of them as DSLs.

I'll dare saying there are enough DSLs out there for any sort of application you may need; you almost certainly don't need to learn how to write your own one.

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This blog provides a nice example based on Objective-C and iOS http://lowcoupling.com/dslengineering

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(addressing the crux of the question)

I think the first time I saw DSL somewhere and its definition as "domain specific language" I also thought it was a particular, concrete language that I just hadn't heard about -- but, no, its a general term for languages that are tailored to a particular application area.

Ironically, if you had just heard about TCL as a "tool command language" you might think, like DSLs, that there would be lots of TCLs for various tools -- but, no, its the specific name of a particular scripting language.

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So, is TCL a DSL? –  Bryan Downing Jun 9 '13 at 6:34
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A DSL is a good way to develop a language to be used by non-programmers. For example, if you have a DSL for the finance people in a company, then rather than programming to their specification you can just let them write the program they want done. Then, if it is too slow then you can take what they wrote that works as they want, write it in a compiled language to speed it up.

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I think it's a language suited to solve problems for a specific domain. It could be some rule-processing language or service description language.

An opposite to a domain specific language (DSL) is a general-purpose language.

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I'd also love to know what the downvotes were for... –  Michael Damatov May 1 '09 at 7:08
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