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I have heard some people who I cannot talk to are big fans of jmock. I've done test centered development for years and so I went through the website and looked at some of the docs and still can't figure out what good it is.

I had the same problem with spring. Their docs do a great job explaining it if you already understand what it is, so I'm not assuming that jmock is of no value. I just don't understand what it does for me.

So if jmock provides me with the ability to mock out stubbed data, let's go with an example of how I do things and see how jmock would be better.

Let's say I have my UI layer that says, create me a widget and the widget service, when creating a widget, initializes the widget and stores pieces of it in the three tables necessary to make up a widget.

When I write my tests, here's how I go about it.

First, I re-point hibernate to my test hypersonic database so I don't have to do a bunch of database set up. Hibernate creates my tables for me.

All of my tests for my classes have static factory methods that construct a test instance of the class for me. Each of my DAOs create test versions that point to the test schema. Then my service class has one that constructs itself with DAOs generated by the test class.

Now, when I run my test of the UI controller that calls the service, I am testing my code all the way through the application. Granted that this is not the total isolation generally wanted when doing a unit test, but it provides me, in my opinion, a better unit test because it executes the real code all the way through all of the supporting layers.

Because Hypersonic under hibernate is slow, it takes slightly longer to run all of my tests, but my entire build still runs in less than five minutes on an older computer for full build and packaging, so I find that pretty acceptable.

How would I do things differently with jmock?

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You mean mocking in general, or jmock as opposed to mockito or easymock or something else? –  Rup Nov 11 '11 at 15:05
    
Well, I'm not familiar with the other tools, so I guess in general. –  The Thom Nov 11 '11 at 15:06
    
possible duplicate of What are mock objects in Java? –  Don Roby Nov 11 '11 at 15:11
    
So it looks like that mock objects are being filled in my model by the factory method on the tests and whether the tests are improved by testing in isolation or going through all of the layers is a matter of taste. Do I understand correctly? –  The Thom Nov 11 '11 at 15:27
    
@Thom: not quite. It's not simply a matter of taste. Integration tests have advantages and disadvantages. Unit tests have advantages and disadvantages. If you do only one, your tests are probably not as useful as they could be. –  Michael Borgwardt Nov 11 '11 at 15:42

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

In your example, there are two interfaces where one would use a mocking framework to do proper unit tests:

  • The interface between the UI layer and the widget service - replacing the widget service with a mock would allow you to test the UI layer in isolation, with the service returning manually created data and the mock verifying that the expected service calls (and no others) happen.
  • The interface between the widget service and the DAO - by replacing the DAO with a mock, any service methods that contain complex logic can be tested in isolation.

Granted that this is not the total isolation generally wanted when doing a unit test, but it provides me, in my opinion, a better unit test because it executes the real code all the way through all of the supporting layers.

This seems to be the core of your question. The answer has a number of facets:

  • If you're not testing components in isolation, you do not have unit tests, you have integration tests. As you observe, these are quite valuable, but they have their drawbacks
  • Since they test more things at the same time, they tend to break more often, they tend to break in large groups (when there's a problem with common functionality) and when they do, it is harder to find out where the actual problem lies
  • They are more constrained in what kinds of scenarios you can test. It can be hard or impossible to simulate certain edge cases in an integration test.
  • Sometimes a full integration test cannot be automated because some component is not sufficiently under your control (e.g. a third-party webservice) to set up the test data you need. In such a case you might even end up using a mocking framework in what is otherwise a high-level integration test.
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Thanks, I now understand. I will have to give this some thought now. –  The Thom Nov 11 '11 at 15:41
    
"Since they test more things at the same time, they tend to break more often, they tend to break in large groups (when there's a problem with common functionality) and when they do, it is harder to find out where the actual problem lies" On the other hand it may break only in one place because a particular test uses the class in a way that I missed in my root tests. I have experienced this along with the other. Much pondering to do on this. Thanks again for the input. –  The Thom Nov 11 '11 at 15:43
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@Thom: you're absolutely right - there are some errors that you can catch only with integration tests, because they are integration errors (i.e. the way your components are connected and interact). –  Michael Borgwardt Nov 11 '11 at 15:50

I haven't looked at JMock in particular (I use Mockito) but in general mock frameworks allow you to "mock" external services such that you only need to test a single class at a time. Any dependencies of that class can be mocked, meaning the real method calls are not made, and instead stubs are called that return or throw constants. This is a good thing, because external calls can be slow, inconsistent, or unreliable--all bad things for unit testing.

To give a single example of how this works, imagine you have a service class that has a dependency on a web service client. If you test with the real web service client, it might be down, the connection might be slow, or the data behind the web service might change over time. How are you going to write a reliable test against that? (You can't). So you use a mock framework to mock/stub the web service client, and you create fake responses, fake errors, fake exceptions, to mimic the web service behavior. The difference is the result is always fast and consistent.

Also, you'd like to test all the failure cases that a given dependency might have, but without mocking that's hard to do. Consider the example I gave above. You'd like to be sure your code does the right thing if the web service throws an IOException because the web service is down (or times out), but it's not so easy to force that condition. With mocking this becomes trivial.

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