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Wikipedia says this is pretty good: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Merge_(revision_control)#Three-way_merge

But how does one implement that? or are there any gems / plugins for Ruby on Rails that will handle that for me?

My situation:
• I have base text
• changes from person A
• changes from person B
• both changes should be included and not overriding the other

any directions I could be pointed in? thanks!

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have you try Google ? first result is –  mb14 Nov 11 '11 at 15:11
    
A google search for "ruby gem three way merge" has this link as the top hit. I have not used it, but it "sounds" like a possibility. –  Mark Wilkins Nov 11 '11 at 15:13
    
I am not good at google today o.o –  NullVoxPopuli Nov 11 '11 at 15:21
    
actually.... I think it'l broken: Merge3::three_way("1234567890", "1a23456", "1234b56", false) RuntimeError: Error nil string passed start=-12 length=22 str=-= –  NullVoxPopuli Nov 11 '11 at 15:45

2 Answers 2

I think you should look at the merge3 gem again [source].

This small example explains it:

require 'rubygems'
require 'merge3'

start = <<TEXT
This is the baseline.
The start.
The end.
TEXT
changed_A = <<TEXT
This is the baseline.
The start (changed by A).
The end.
TEXT
changed_B = <<TEXT
This is the baseline.
The start.
B added this line.
The end.
TEXT

result = Merge3::three_way(start, changed_A, changed_B)

puts result

The output it generates is:

This is the baseline.
The start (changed by A).
B added this line.
The end.

I am not sure how it handles merge conflicts, and since it is supposed to handle 3-way merges of files, it seems to be line-based. If that is a problem (as your example tries to compare simple string), you could add a newline between every character.

Hope this helps.

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If you're storing versioned text that you want to be able to merge, then it sounds like you have a perfect use case for calling a version control system. Store the text in files and call the VCS for version control operations (perhaps the Git or Grit gems would be helpful).

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I am forever a noob when it comes to versioning like git. I know you can make diffs with the git gem. rubydoc.info/gems/git/1.2.5 . But there are no examples of usage / how to do things. o.o –  NullVoxPopuli Nov 11 '11 at 18:33
    
No programmer can afford to be "forever a noob" on versioning issues. –  Marnen Laibow-Koser Nov 11 '11 at 18:35
1  
well, I can use real git like a boss. but undocumented gems are a huge pet peeve. o.o –  NullVoxPopuli Nov 11 '11 at 18:40
    
Yeah, me too. Now I understand. Perhaps there are usage examples somewhere? Or try Grit? –  Marnen Laibow-Koser Nov 11 '11 at 18:42
2  
I tend to think it's better to farm out to Git than reinvent the wheel, but if you really need the DB backups, I can see why you might not do that. –  Marnen Laibow-Koser Nov 11 '11 at 19:42

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