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I'm working on a specialized on-disk hashtable (prior experiments with Berkeley, ManagedESENT, etc. didn't pan out). It has a fairly simple chained structure, with each key-value pair (KVP) followed in the file by a long (Int64) value that points to the next KVP in the chain (and uses a value of zero if there isn't one). I'm using MD5 to generate the hash code.

When profiling the code to assess the speed of adding entries, the hash function is responsible for about 55% of the running time, which isn't totally surprising. But about 25% of that time is coming from the binForm.Serialize(ms, obj) call in the ObjectToByteArray serialization function. Both functions are shown below. I'm assuming I can't make any big gains on the hash algorithm itself, but I'm wondering if I can eke some performance out of the serialization function?

    // Compute hash code
    long hash(object s)
    {
        byte[] y = md5.ComputeHash(ObjectToByteArray(s)); // Produces byte[16]
        long z = BitConverter.ToInt64(y, 0);
        long res = z & bitMask;
        return res;
    }

    // Convert an object to a byte array
    private byte[] ObjectToByteArray(Object obj)
    {
        if (obj == null)
            return null;

        MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream();
        binForm.Serialize(ms, obj);
        return ms.ToArray();
    }
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I don't think you have to use a complex hash function such as md5. You can even use ObjectToByteArray(s).GetHashCode() because it doesn't have to be as !unique! as md5 –  L.B Nov 11 '11 at 16:51
    
That's interesting. In addition to any serialization gains I can get, I'll give it a shot and see if it speeds things up. Thanks. –  Gadzooks34 Nov 11 '11 at 16:58
    
And here is the performance comparisons of Json serializers + BinaryFormatter codeproject.com/KB/IP/fastJSON.aspx –  L.B Nov 11 '11 at 17:01
    
I looked into fastJSON but couldn't figure out how it could be used as a binary serializer (i.e. how to produce a byte[]). –  Gadzooks34 Nov 11 '11 at 18:54
    
Of course, since it not a binary serializer. It convert your object to Json string Then you can get byte[] as Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(jsonstring) –  L.B Nov 11 '11 at 19:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use protobuf.net, found here, it's far quicker!

Update

From looking at your code I assume there is no requriement that computed hashes be consistent across AppDomains? If not computing your HashCode can be as simple as:

private static long GenerateHash(object key)
{
  long typeHash = key.GetType().GetHashCode();
  long keyHash = key.GetHashCode();
  return (typeHash << 32) + keyHash;
}

For future reference, your MemoryStream should really be in a using block, or else you run the risk of leaking memory:

private byte[] ObjectToByteArray(Object obj)
{
    if (obj == null)
        return null;

    using (MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream()) 
    {
      binForm.Serialize(ms, obj);
      return ms.ToArray();
    }   
}
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it's actally quite slow from my experience. –  Alex Nov 11 '11 at 16:44
    
@Alex, sorry your comment came in as I was updating... I assume you're referring to BinaryFormatter? –  rich.okelly Nov 11 '11 at 16:45
    
yes. protobuf isn't slow at all. –  Alex Nov 11 '11 at 16:48
    
Thanks, Rich. I actually use Protobuf to serialize the KVPs, and it's great. But Protobuf can only serialize decorated "ProtoContract" classes, right? How can I use it to serialize an unknown object? –  Gadzooks34 Nov 11 '11 at 16:51
    
Wrt the update, that's correct. Very good idea. I will give it a shot and report back. Thanks. –  Gadzooks34 Nov 11 '11 at 17:03

binary formatter is known for its slow performance. try other methods of serialization.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks - I agree, it's quite slow. But it's not obvious to me what better serialization alternatives exist (see above comment on Protobuf). Do you have any recs? –  Gadzooks34 Nov 11 '11 at 16:53

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