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This is a sample code

$a=array('a,b','cd');
$b=implode(',',$a);
$c=explode(',',$b);
print_r($c);

because I have ',' in $a[0] print_r($c); result is

Array ( [0] => a [1] => b [2] => cd )

is there any option to explode ignore ',' in string and I have

Array ( [0] => a,b [3] => b [2] => cd )

or only solution is choose better separator like "*?-"

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I would use a different separator, maybe a |. Maybe you could make $a a multidimensional array. –  Jeff Hines Nov 11 '11 at 17:00
    
What is the actual problem you are trying to solve? There may be an entirely different way of solving it that has nothing to do with implode and explode. –  evan Nov 11 '11 at 17:05

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Once you implode the array with a character that it's already in any of the elements, there's no simple way to detect that. So my recommendation is for you to change the separator, or you will end up comparing your string with the original array, and that will become a mess.

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The functions implode() and explode() are completely independently. They have no "memory" or "knowledge" of each other or what each other has done.

So, explode() has no idea that implode() used a character it is going to use. In fact, for some people that may be a valid use case and they want to split on all the commas.

This is a pretty standard problem when using any sort of meta or escape character. What do you do when you see that character and it is supposed to be there? You escape the escape character. Example as a string with escape characters:
"\tHello,\nI need something to do\\think about.\n"

This is not just done with a simple explode/implode. This is fixed with a parser.

The easiest thing for you is to make the separator something completely unique. It doesn't have to be one character. Or you can do more highly complex parsing.

$separator = 'abcd1234(*&@#@%asdf___jasldfkj'; // something very unlikely to actually exist
$a=array('a,b', 'cd');
$b=implode($separator, $a);
$c=explode($separator, $b);
print_r($c);

result:

Array 
( 
    [0] => a,b 
    [1] => cd 
)
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You should choose a character or multiple characters that you know will not appear in the text you are going to be imploding/exploding. If you have a bunch of text that has commas in it then you implode them all with a comma, you're going to have an extremely difficult time trying to explode them all back on that comma. In fact, it probably wouldn't be possible without the original data.

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