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I have a problen when I try to print the result of a function several times. lets say for example that after several commands the result is that dreawing

()()()
 ()()
  ()

now I want to duplicate it according to a function so i used a loop but it will only print it again in a vertical way like that:

()()()
 ()()
  ()

()()()
 ()()
  ()

()()()
 ()()
  ()

while I want it to be horizontal like that:

()()()  ()()()   ()()()
 ()()    ()()     ()()
  ()      ()       ()

can you help me??

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1  
You'll have to store each line in an array. Then duplicate each array entry, and adjust spacing between the parentheses. Alternatively, you could just rotate your screen by 90 degrees - or post example code. –  phimuemue Nov 11 '11 at 17:15
1  
@phimuemue you forgot the "rotate your head" solution –  Simon Nov 11 '11 at 17:20

1 Answer 1

Here is a working solution to your problem.

lines = [
"()()()",
" ()()",
"  ()"
]

def replicate(lines, n):
    width = reduce(max, map(len, lines))
    return (' '.join([line.ljust(width)] * n) for line in lines)

for line in replicate(lines, 3):
    print line

edit: added spacing management

edit2: used a generator expression because of peer pressure :-)

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You can make your code faster by changing your list comprehension to a generator expression (ie. replace the [] with ()) –  GWW Nov 11 '11 at 17:35
1  
@GWW: Well, it's probably not faster in this case because the full computation needs to be done in any case (laziness comes at a price). But yes, it's a very good idea to use generator by default (i.e. unless a sequence is really required). –  delnan Nov 11 '11 at 17:38
    
@delnan: Wouldn't it prevent an intermediate list from being created? –  GWW Nov 11 '11 at 17:38
1  
@GWW: Probably. But allocating a tiny list is fast, and so is storing a few string pointers in it. The overhead of resuming and pausing the generator and making its local variables persistent likely outweights it. In any case, the difference will be negible, so performance worries are moot. But for the record, xs = [i * i for i in range(100)]; for i in xs: pass is 2us faster than the list comprehension equivalent on my box running 3.2. –  delnan Nov 11 '11 at 17:40
    
@delnan: Ah okay I see what you mean now. I didn't think about it that way thanks :) –  GWW Nov 11 '11 at 17:41

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