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I have a layout that requires a list of items to be organized into two vertical columns. The items are in a single list of <div>s, with the markup also being re-purposed for mobile, so I don't want to modify the structure.

The problem I have here is that each item has an expanding content area which the user can toggle, and when this content is expanded the vertical space for that column needs to expand downward with the other column staying fixed.

Right now I have a basic solution with floated items, but when I expand the content areas the vertical space expands in both columns instead of just the one.

Here's a link to an example of the functionality as I have it now, and below is a screenshot of what the desired behavior should be.

[screenshot]

Is it possible to style this to support the required behavior? Or am I going to have to modify the structure of items in order to get this to work? Thanks in advance for your help!

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1  
Honestly I don't see how this would be possible without changing the markup or some crazy jQuery... –  Kyle Nov 11 '11 at 17:58

6 Answers 6

Your premise is flawed. Document structure flows left-to-right, top-to-bottom. You will need to make some change to the structure... Easiest would be adding two containers for a left column and a right column. Otherwise, you're in for some tricky absolute positioning markup, and a little funky jquery, which I can only suggest with the addition of some unique IDs for each of the panels.

I would, personally, add ids such as panel1 through panel4 per your example, then use this javascript (or similar) as a jumping off point:

for(var i=1; i<=4; i++) {
        $('#panel'+i).css('left', function(index) {
           if(i%2 == 0) return "120px";
           else return "0px"; 
        });
}

$('.more').click(function(e) {
    e.preventDefault();
    $(this).parent().children('p').toggle();
    var id = $(this).parent().attr("id");
    switch( id ) {
        case 'panel1':
          console.log("panel1 found");
          $('#panel3').css('top', function(index) {
            var buffer = $('#'+id).height() + 20 + "px";
            return buffer;
          });
          break;
        case 'panel2':
          $('#panel4').css('top', function(index) {
            var buffer = $('#'+id).height() + 20 + "px";
            return buffer;
          });
          break;
        default: break;
    }
});

With the default values in the css for those panels:

#panel1 { top:0px; }
#panel2 { top:0px; }
#panel3 { top:56px; }
#panel4 { top:56px; }

The less you tweak the html, the more work you'll create in javascript.

edit:

Proposed alternate Javascript to remove need to alter HTML, assuming two elements per row. Since we know the row to be the problem...

var ct = 1
$('#container > div').each(function(index, domEle) {
  $(domEle).attr('id', 'panel'+ct);
  $('#panel'+ct).css({
     'position': 'absolute',
     'left' : function(index, value) {
        if(ct%2 == 0) return "120px";
        else return "0px"; 
     },
     'top' : function(index, value) {
        return (56 * Math.floor(ct/3)) + "px";
     }
  });
  ct++;
});

$('.more').click(function(e) {
    e.preventDefault();
    $(this).parent().children('p').toggle();
    var id = $(this).parent().attr("id");

    switch( id ) {
        case 'panel1':
          $('#panel3').css('top', function(index) {
            var buffer = $('#'+id).height() + 20 + "px";
            return buffer;
          });
          break;
        case 'panel2':
          $('#panel4').css('top', function(index) {
            var buffer = $('#'+id).height() + 20 + "px";
            return buffer;
          });
          break;
        default: break;
    }
});

Now no changes need be made to the HTML, though you'll want to redo the click function to handle repositioning of elements after a click. I would make life easy and hide all .more items before expanding a new box, since it would mean having to calculate the heights of all elements above, but how much work you want to make is your business.

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Thanks for the response. This kind of solution and the one that @Paul Podlipensky recommended were two that I thought of and was hoping to avoid--it's becoming apparent that I'll likely have to embrace one of them though, likely the markup based one. Thanks again. –  ataddeini Nov 15 '11 at 19:33
    
It can be done with pure javascript. It's just not going to be fun. You're going to have to count all sub elements, and decide whether or not they should be in column 1 or column 2. It's not attractive, but it's an option. –  stslavik Nov 15 '11 at 21:55
    
Yeah, I ended up punting and going the route of floated 'column' divs in the markup. I was then able to render the even panels in column 1, and the odd ones in column 2 relatively easily. Thanks again for you efforts. –  ataddeini Nov 15 '11 at 22:59

Here's a PURE CSS SOLUTION for four panels (I don't know if you intended to have more, and I do not have six [2 wide 3 high] working yet--and suspect it is not possible). It works in FF and IE8/9. See the fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/bEgwB/203/

However, IE8 experiences a redraw bug that keeps panel 3 from moving so it needs extra javascript help (added in fiddle above), and IE7 needs some margin adjustments to get panel 4 positioned correctly (but does not have the redraw issue even without the extra javascript help). UPDATE (11-18-11): here's the fiddle for IE7 margin adjustment: http://jsfiddle.net/bEgwB/286/

EDIT: a previous version of my CSS had display calls that were unnecessary.

HTML

<div id="container">
    <div class="panel one">
        Panel 1<br />
        <a class="more" href="#">more</a>
        <p>More Info 1 with some additional content</p>
    </div>
    <div class="panel two">
        Panel 2<br />
        <a class="more" href="#">more</a>
        <p>More Info 2 with some additional content</p>
    </div>
    <div class="panel three">
        Panel 3<br />
        <a class="more" href="#">more</a>
        <p>More Info 3 with some additional content</p>
    </div>
    <div class="panel four">
        Panel 4<br />
        <a class="more" href="#">more</a>
        <p>More Info 4 with some additional content</p>
    </div>
</div>

CSS

a {color:yellow;}
#container {width:0 ; padding: 0 130px;}
.panel {
    background-color:green;
    padding:5px;
    color:#fff;
    width:100px;
}
.panel p {display:none;}

.panel.one {
    float: left;
    margin:10px 0 10px -120px;
}
.panel.two {
    float: right;
    margin: 10px -120px 20px 0;
}
.panel.three {
    float: left;
    clear: left;
    margin:10px 10px 10px -120px;
}
.panel.four {
    clear: right;
    margin: 10px;
}

JAVASCRIPT

$('.more').click(function(e) {
    e.preventDefault();
    $(this).parent().children('p').toggle();
    /* the following fix IE8 */
    $(this).parent().parent().hide();
    $(this).parent().parent().show();
});
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Scott. The real scenario I have will actually need a fluctuating number of items (anywhere from 3 to 12) but this is helpful. +1. –  ataddeini Nov 16 '11 at 17:43
    
Yes, I'm trying to figure out a fix for 6+ elements. The problem is, once element 4 is given a float: right (so that a potential element 5 will sit next to 4's expansion) then it has the same behavior as you originally were experiencing. –  ScottS Nov 16 '11 at 18:12

You need to add two more div's - left and right column and split your items between these two divs. This is the way how to make them independent, here is jsfiddle for this.

HTML

<div id="container">
    <div class="left">
        <div class="panel">
            Panel 1<br />
            <a class="more" href="#">more</a>
            <p>More Info 1 with some additional content</p>
        </div>
        <div class="panel alt">
            Panel 2<br />
            <a class="more" href="#">more</a>
            <p>More Info 2 with some additional content</p>
        </div>
    </div>
    <div class="right">
        <div class="panel">
            Panel 3<br />
            <a class="more" href="#">more</a>
            <p>More Info 3 with some additional content</p>
        </div>
        <div class="panel alt">
            Panel 4<br />
            <a class="more" href="#">more</a>
            <p>More Info 4 with some additional content</p>
        </div>
    </div>
</div>

CSS

a {color:yellow;}
#container {width:300px; position:relative;}
.panel {background-color:green;padding:5px;color:#fff;width:100px;margin:10px;}
.panel p {display:none;}
.left {
    width: 50%;
    float: left;
}
.right {
    width: 50%;
    float: right;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the response. Yeah, that's kind of what I'm hoping to avoid. I'm using an ASP.NET repeater to render these, and I would need to find some way to alternate placing the items in the 'left' and 'right' <div>s. I can't just place the first half on the right, and the rest on the left-they need to be ordered from left to right. –  ataddeini Nov 11 '11 at 18:06
    
You can render them as you need and then re-arrange into columns by using javascript on the client (if you can't find the way to split them on the server side). –  Pavel Podlipensky Nov 11 '11 at 18:12

May be you can do it column-count property like this:

a {color:yellow;}
#container {
    width:300px;
    -moz-column-count: 2;
        -moz-column-gap: 50%;
        -webkit-column-count: 2;
        -webkit-column-gap: 50%;
        column-count: 2;
        column-gap: 50%;

}
.panel p {display:none;}
.panel {background-color:green;padding:5px;color:#fff;width:100px;margin:10px;}
.alt{
    margin-bottom:90px;
}

Check this fiddle http://jsfiddle.net/bEgwB/87/

UPDATED

Check this:

http://jsfiddle.net/bEgwB/276/

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Doesn't look too bad, though it seems to have some strange display quirks in chrome (not sure if that's -webkit or what). It still does have the problem of having to re-order the panels to 1,3,2,4 instead of 1,2,3,4 though. I wanted to double purpose the markup with a single column layout (for mobile) that will need to be in sequential order. –  ataddeini Nov 16 '11 at 13:10
    
When I expand panels 2 and 4, part of 2 goes below 3. So this solution has an issue in that the margin-bottom on the alt class is rather arbitrary and would need to account for variable heights in 2 and 4. If there is a way to force panel 2 not to jump over to the first column, then this might be moving toward a good solution (except the reordering of html that ataddeini noted). –  ScottS Nov 16 '11 at 18:19
    
Updated jsfiddle is the closest I've seen, and with minimal CSS too. IE has some quirks with it (of course), but not in the way I'd expect--IE7 works fine, IE8 works except for panel 1 (which pushes down the left column) and of all versions, IE9 completely falls on it's face--doesn't even render correctly from the start. Chrome and Firefox both work perfectly. Yeah, I would say this is closest. +1. –  ataddeini Nov 18 '11 at 17:45
    
Still doesn't work with 6+ panels (just like mine does not). See jsfiddle.net/bEgwB/277 Though the code is cleaner and slimmer than mine, but mine does work in IE 8 and 9 for four panels. –  ScottS Nov 18 '11 at 23:26
    
@Scott: Ah yes, good point. Didn't quite realize those affects. –  ataddeini Nov 19 '11 at 2:43

There is a styling solution. To tie the two columns together they need an extra level of binding you can do that by adding a style attribute to "container", "display:table" and to the panels with "display:table-cell".

That will keep the heights in synch. Both "container" and the "panel" class must have a declared width or they really mess up the layout. IE is weak on support of these attributes, so that could be a problem with the solution.

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I actually don't want the heights in sync, I want them to be offset. The standard float solution keeps them in sync too, but this wasn't the desired behavior. Thanks for your answer though. –  ataddeini Nov 15 '11 at 22:59

If I correctly inderstand, that do you you want is something like this http://jsfiddle.net/bEgwB/275/

You need to use both css properties display:inline-block and float:left to implement effect like on your jpg. If my markup right and this looks as expected, I may help you with javascript, if it not ok now

Good luck.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer. That seems to push down the panels independently sometimes, but it looks like panel 3 jumps to the second column when panel 1 is expanded--that would need to stay in column 1 (maybe a clear:left would take care of that?) Also it looks like when panel 2 is expanded, column 1 expands as well. These would need to expand independently. –  ataddeini Nov 17 '11 at 21:31

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