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Through documentation i can find only one difference that is save method generates returns the object as generated identifier but persist does not.Is it the only purpose for providing persist method.If yes how does it help it to programmer becuase even if he does not intend to use generated identifier he can use save and ignore the return value.

Also came thru this thread at Whats the advantage of persist() vs save() in Hibernate?. The meaningful statement i can get from this thread is persist() also guarantees that it will not execute an INSERT statement if it is called outside of transaction boundaries which save method does but not sure how should i try it in my programme so that i can get actual difference?

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possible duplicate of What's the advantage of persist() vs save() in Hibernate? – Stijn Geukens Jan 24 '14 at 15:32
up vote 8 down vote accepted

I did some mock testing to record the difference between Save() and Persist().

Sounds like both these methods behaves same when dealing with Transient Entity but differ when dealing with Detached Entity.

For the below example , take EmployeeVehicle as an Entity with PK as vehicleId which is a generated value and vehicleName as one of its property .

Example 1 : Dealing with Transient Object

                 Session session = factory.openSession();
                 session.beginTransaction();
                 EmployeeVehicle entity = new EmployeeVehicle();
                    entity.setVehicleName("Honda");
                 session.save(entity);
                 // session.persist(entity);
                session.getTransaction().commit();
                session.close();

Result : select nextval ('hibernate_sequence') // This is for vehicle Id generated : 36

insert into Employee_Vehicle ( Vehicle_Name, Vehicle_Id) values ( Honda, 36)

Repeat the same with using persist(entity) and will result the same with new Id ( say 37 , honda ) ;

Example 2 : Dealing with Detached Object

// Session 1 
            // Get the previously saved Vehicle Entity 
           Session session = factory.openSession();
            session.beginTransaction();
            EmployeeVehicle entity = (EmployeeVehicle)session.get(EmployeeVehicle.class, 36);
           session.close();

           // Session 2
           // Here in Session 2 , vehicle entity obtained in previous session is a detached object and now we will try to save / persist it 
         (i) Using Save() to persist a detached object 
           Session session2 = factory.openSession();
            session2.beginTransaction();
                    entity.setVehicleName("Toyota");
            session2.save(entity);
            session2.getTransaction().commit();
            session2.close();

Result : You might be expecting the Vehicle with id : 36 obtained in previous session is updated with name as "Toyota" . But what happens is that a new entity is saved in the DB with new Id generated for and Name as "Toyota"

         select nextval ('hibernate_sequence')
         insert into Employee_Vehicle ( Vehicle_Name, Vehicle_Id) values ( Toyota, 39)

         (ii) Using Persist()  to persist a detached object 

            // Session 1 
            Session session = factory.openSession();
    session.beginTransaction();
    EmployeeVehicle entity = EmployeeVehicle)session.get(EmployeeVehicle.class, 36);
    session.close();

// Session 2 // Here in Session 2 , vehicle entity obtained in previous session is a detached object and now we will try to save / persist it (i) Using persist() to persist a detached object

            Session session2 = factory.openSession();
    session2.beginTransaction();
            entity.setVehicleName("Toyota");
    session2.persist(entity);
    session2.getTransaction().commit();
    session2.close();

Result : Exception being thrown : detached entity passed to persist

So, it is always better to use Persist() rather than Save() as save has to be carefully used when dealing with session and transcation .

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what if if entity is persistent but not detached and then use save or persistent ? – M Sach Sep 15 '15 at 5:43

save() Persists an entity. Will assign an identifier if one doesn't exist. If one does, it's essentially doing an update. Returns the generated ID of the entity.

persist() is used on transient objects. It does not return the generated ID.

This is the difference as far as i know and also take a look at this issue on hibernate onjira Remove persist() on Session API is closed and Resolution : rejected

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6  
This is not entirely true. AFAIK, save does not update if the record exists, you have to call safeOrUpdate for this. save would throw an exception in this case. – Stefan Steinegger Sep 19 '13 at 11:47

Persist():

  • It is a void method and does not guarantee that identifier value is assigned to persistence instance after INSERT. the assignment might happen at flush time.
  • It will not be executed if its called from outside transactions boundaries.
  • It will be useful for long-running conversations with extended session/persistence context.

Save():

  • It will return the identifier after executing INSERT.
  • It will be executed even outside transaction boundary.
  • It is not useful for long-running conversations.
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public class TestSave {

public static void main(String[] args) {

    Session session= HibernateUtil.getSessionFactory().openSession();
    Person person= (Person) session.get(Person.class, 1);
    System.out.println(person.getName());
    session.close();

    Session session1= HibernateUtil.getSessionFactory().openSession();
    session1.beginTransaction();

    person.setName("person saved with Persist");
    session1.getTransaction().commit();
    System.out.println(session1.save(person));

    //session1.persist(person);
    session1.flush();

    session1.close();

}
}

Difference between Save and persist , Save execute outside the Transaction. Execute the above code and check the console System.out.println(session1.save(person)) will return with identifier and execute it again, it will increment your identifier. Now if you try to Save another record in Person table in database with the below code and refresh the databse table and check the id column in database. Its value will be incremented.

public class TestMain {
  public static void main(String[] args) {
    Person person = new Person();
    saveEntity(person);
 }
private static void saveEntity(Person person) {
person.setId(1);
 person.setName("Concretepage1");
 Session session = HibernateUtil.getSessionFactory().openSession();
 session.beginTransaction();
 session.save(person);
 session.getTransaction().commit();
 session.close();
}

If we try to persist data outside transaction boundary it give exception.

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Actually the difference between hibernate save() and persist() methods is depends on generator class we are using.

<generator class="assigned"></generator>  
  • If our generator class is assigned, then there is no difference between save() and persist() methods. Because generator ‘assigned’ means, as a programmer we need to give the primary key value to save in the database
  • In case of other than assigned generator class, suppose if our generator class name is Increment means hibernate it self will assign the primary key id value into the database.so in this case if we call save() or persist() method then it will insert the record into the database normally.

But here thing is, save() method can return that primary key id value which is generated by hibernate and we can see it by

long s = session.save(k);

In this same case, persist() will never give any value back to the client.

Source

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