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Given a list whose length <= N, what is the best / most efficient way to fill it up with trailing NULLs up to length (so that it has length N).

This is something which is a one-liner in any decent language, but I don't have a clue how to do it (efficiently) in a few lines in R so that it works for every corner case (zero length list etc.).

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6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Let's keep it really simple:

tst<-1:10 #whatever, to get a vector of length 10
tst<-tst[1:15]
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That's it. This solution is 2x faster than than the one proposed by Matthew Dowle, and about 5x faster then my clumsy solution. –  leden Nov 11 '11 at 18:40
    
@leden. Yet another way is simply length(tst)=15. Any faster? How did you test? –  Matt Dowle Nov 11 '11 at 20:14
    
Yep, this is even faster for large lists. Thanks. –  leden Nov 11 '11 at 23:32
    
How is this a list? :) –  Roman Luštrik Nov 13 '11 at 21:36
    
@RomanLuštrik : ahem. Fortunately, it also works for tst<-list(1,2,3). But of course, a list is just a special case of a vector, so I thought I'd provide the more general solution. <Cough/> –  Nick Sabbe Nov 17 '11 at 10:27

Try this :

> l = list("a",1:3)
> N = 5
> l[N+1]=NULL
> l
[[1]]
[1] "a"

[[2]]
[1] 1 2 3

[[3]]
NULL

[[4]]
NULL

[[5]]
NULL

>
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How about this ?

> l = list("a",1:3)
> length(l)=5
> l
[[1]]
[1] "a"

[[2]]
[1] 1 2 3

[[3]]
NULL

[[4]]
NULL

[[5]]
NULL
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Directly editing the list's length appears to be the fastest as far as I can tell:

tmp <- vector("list",5000)
sol1 <- function(x){
    x <- x[1:10000] 
}
sol2 <- function(x){
    x[10001] <- NULL
}
sol3 <- function(x){
    length(x) <- 10000
}

library(rbenchmark)
benchmark(sol1(tmp),sol2(tmp),sol3(tmp),replications = 5000)
       test replications elapsed relative user.self sys.self user.child sys.child
1 sol1(tmp)         5000   2.045 1.394952     1.327    0.727          0         0
2 sol2(tmp)         5000   2.849 1.943383     1.804    1.075          0         0
3 sol3(tmp)         5000   1.466 1.000000     0.937    0.548          0         0

But the differences aren't huge, unless you're doing this a lot on very long lists, I suppose.

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I'm sure there are shorter ways, but I would be inclined to do:

l <- as.list(1:10)
N <- 15
l <- c(l, as.list(rep(NA, N - length(l) )))
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Hi: I'm not sure if you were talking about an actual list but, if you were, below will work. It works because, once you access the element of a vector ( which is a list is ) that is not there, R expands the vector to that length.

length <- 10
temp <- list("a","b")
print(temp)
temp[length] <- NULL
print(temp)
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