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Let's say I have an array, @theArr, which holds 1,000 or so elements such as the following:

01  '12 16 sj.1012804p1012831.93.gz'
02  '12 16 sj.1012832p1012859.94.gz'
03  '12 16 sj.1012860p1012887.95.gz'
04  '12 16 sj.1012888p1012915.96.gz'
05  '12 16 sj.1012916p1012943.97.gz'
06  '12 16 sj.875352p875407.01.gz'
07  '12 16 sj.875408p875435.02.gz'
08  '12 16 sj.875436p875535.03.gz'
09  '12 16 sj.875536p875575.04.gz'
10  '12 16 sj.875576p875603.05.gz'
11  '12 16 sj.875604p875631.06.gz'
12  '12 16 sj.875632p875659.07.gz'
13  '12 16 sj.875660p875687.08.gz'
14  '12 16 sj.875688p875715.09.gz'
15  '12 16 sj.875716p875743.10.gz'
...

If my first set of numbers (between the 'sj.' and the 'p') was always 6 digits, I wouldn't have a problem. But, when the numbers roll over into 7 digits the default sort stops working as the larger 7 digit numbers comes before the smaller 6 digit number.

Is there a way to tell Perl to sort by that number inside the string in each array element?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 17 down vote accepted

Looks like you need a Schwartzian Transform:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my @a = <DATA>;

print 
    map  { $_->[1] }                #get the original value back
    sort { $a->[0] <=> $b->[0] }    #sort arrayrefs numerically on the sort value
    map  { /sj\.(.*?)p/; [$1, $_] } #build arrayref of the sort value and orig
    @a;

__DATA__
12 16 sj.1012804p1012831.93.gz
12 16 sj.1012832p1012859.94.gz
12 16 sj.1012860p1012887.95.gz
12 16 sj.1012888p1012915.96.gz
12 16 sj.1012916p1012943.97.gz
12 16 sj.875352p875407.01.gz
12 16 sj.875408p875435.02.gz
12 16 sj.875436p875535.03.gz
12 16 sj.875536p875575.04.gz
12 16 sj.875576p875603.05.gz
12 16 sj.875604p875631.06.gz
12 16 sj.875632p875659.07.gz
12 16 sj.875660p875687.08.gz
12 16 sj.875688p875715.09.gz
12 16 sj.875716p875743.10.gz
share|improve this answer
    
Your regex is wrong. The number part stops on the "p", not the ., so your regex should be /sj\.(\d+)p/ –  mkb May 1 '09 at 1:09
2  
Do not use \d to mean [0-9]. In Perl 5.8 and 5.10 it means any UNICODE character that has the digit property. This means that if you are trying to use \d to mean [0-9] you will also inadvertently match "\x{1815}" (MONGOLIAN DIGIT 5). –  Chas. Owens May 1 '09 at 1:14
1  
@Chas: I did not know that about \d. (That must be what's causing my bugs -- all those MONGOLIAN DIGIT 5s out there... ;)) –  j_random_hacker May 1 '09 at 4:45
    
One thing though: depending on the data, this seems to sort it in descending order or sometimes in ascending order. Any reason why? –  messick May 1 '09 at 8:54
    
nevermind, I had data that didn't match the regexp in the second map –  messick May 1 '09 at 8:58

You can use a regex to pull the number out of every line inside the block you pass to the sort function:

@newArray = sort { my ($anum,$bnum); $a =~ /sj\.([0-9]+)p/; $anum = $1; $b =~ /sj\.(\d+)p/; $bnum = $1; $anum <=> $bnum } @theArr;

However, Chas. Owens's solution is better, since it only does the regex matches once for every element.

share|improve this answer
    
\d does not mean what you think it means. In Perl 5.8 and 5.10 it means any UNICODE character that has the digit property. This means that if you are trying to use \d to mean [0-9] you will also inadvertently match "\x{1815}" (MONGOLIAN DIGIT 5). –  Chas. Owens May 1 '09 at 1:18

Here's an example that sorts them ascending, assuming you don't care too much about efficiency:

use strict;

my @theArr = split(/\n/, <<END_SAMPLE);
12 16 sj.1012804p1012831.93.gz
12 16 sj.1012832p1012859.94.gz
12 16 sj.1012860p1012887.95.gz
12 16 sj.1012888p1012915.96.gz
12 16 sj.1012916p1012943.97.gz
12 16 sj.875352p875407.01.gz
12 16 sj.875408p875435.02.gz
12 16 sj.875436p875535.03.gz
12 16 sj.875536p875575.04.gz
12 16 sj.875576p875603.05.gz
END_SAMPLE

my @sortedArr = sort compareBySJ @theArr;

print "Before:\n".join("\n", @theArr)."\n";
print "After:\n".join("\n", @sortedArr)."\n";

sub compareBySJ {
    # Capture the values to compare, against the expected format
    # NOTE: This could be inefficient for large, unsorted arrays
    #       since you'll be matching the same strings repeatedly
    my ($aVal) = $a =~ /^\d+\s+\d+\s+sj\.(\d+)p/
        or die "Couldn't match against value $a";
    my ($bVal) = $b =~ /^\d+\s+\d+\s+sj\.(\d+)p/
        or die "Couldn't match against value $a";

    # Return the numerical comparison of the values (ascending order)
    return $aVal <=> $bVal;
}

Outputs:

Before:
12 16 sj.1012804p1012831.93.gz
12 16 sj.1012832p1012859.94.gz
12 16 sj.1012860p1012887.95.gz
12 16 sj.1012888p1012915.96.gz
12 16 sj.1012916p1012943.97.gz
12 16 sj.875352p875407.01.gz
12 16 sj.875408p875435.02.gz
12 16 sj.875436p875535.03.gz
12 16 sj.875536p875575.04.gz
12 16 sj.875576p875603.05.gz
After:
12 16 sj.875352p875407.01.gz
12 16 sj.875408p875435.02.gz
12 16 sj.875436p875535.03.gz
12 16 sj.875536p875575.04.gz
12 16 sj.875576p875603.05.gz
12 16 sj.1012804p1012831.93.gz
12 16 sj.1012832p1012859.94.gz
12 16 sj.1012860p1012887.95.gz
12 16 sj.1012888p1012915.96.gz
12 16 sj.1012916p1012943.97.gz
share|improve this answer
    
I think your before print is in the wrong place. –  Chas. Owens May 1 '09 at 1:17
    
\d does not mean what you think it means. In Perl 5.8 and 5.10 it means any UNICODE character that has the digit property. This means that if you are trying to use \d to mean [0-9] you will also inadvertently match "\x{1815}" (MONGOLIAN DIGIT 5). –  Chas. Owens May 1 '09 at 1:18
    
Thanks, and point taken on the \d. –  Plate May 1 '09 at 1:40

Yes. The sort function takes an optional comparison function which will be used to compare two elements. It can take the form of either a block of code, or the name of a function to call.

There is an example at the linked document that is similar to what you want to do:

# inefficiently sort by descending numeric compare using
# the first integer after the first = sign, or the
# whole record case-insensitively otherwise

@new = sort {
($b =~ /=(\d+)/)[0] <=> ($a =~ /=(\d+)/)[0]
		    ||
            uc($a)  cmp  uc($b)
} @old;
share|improve this answer
    
\d does not mean what you think it means. In Perl 5.8 and 5.10 it means any UNICODE character that has the digit property. This means that if you are trying to use \d to mean [0-9] you will also inadvertently match "\x{1815}" (MONGOLIAN DIGIT 5). –  Chas. Owens May 1 '09 at 1:18
    
+1, but Chas. Owens' solution is likely to be quite a bit faster as regex matching is only performed once. –  j_random_hacker May 1 '09 at 4:50
    
So that's three (maybe four times) in one thread that we have heard about the dreaded 'MONGOLIAN DIGIT' problem. I'm genuinely curious: did you have a really bad case of Mongolian data flu at some point? –  Telemachus May 1 '09 at 11:30
    
No, just trying to make sure people get the news to stop using \d (at least in Perl 5.8 and 5.10). And maybe if enough people find out, there will be enough pressure to get it fixed in 5.12. U+1815 is just a handy you-will-never-want-to-match-this character. –  Chas. Owens May 1 '09 at 12:18
1  
@ Michael Carman - The problem is "knowing" your data is ASCII. We are increasingly moving into a world were UTF-8 is the default character encoding. Any code you write today that assumes it is working on ASCII will break tomorrow. As for matching any digit characters, there is always \p{N}, \p{Nd}, \p{Nl}, \p{No}, which are much better since the state explicitly what type of digit you are looking for. Until "\x{1815}" + 1 is 6, \d should mean [0-9] because people use \d to mean "numbers I can do math with". –  Chas. Owens May 1 '09 at 15:05

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