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I have a 165 x 165 rank matrix such that each row has values ranging from 1-165. I want to parse each row and delete all values >= 5, sort each row in increasing order, then replace the values 1-5 with the name of the column from the original matrix.

For example, for row k the values 1 ,2 3, 4, 5, would result after the first two transformations and would be replaced by p,d, m, n, a.

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1  
How does your input data look? –  Leonardo Herrera Nov 11 '11 at 18:41
1  
What have you tried? –  DVK Nov 11 '11 at 18:41
    
I presume >=5 should read >5 –  potong Nov 12 '11 at 2:22

2 Answers 2

I am assuming that your array consists of an array of arrays...

Neither Awk, Sed, or Perl have multi-dimensional arrays. However, they can be emulated in Perl by using arrays of arrays.

$a[0]->[0] = xx;
$a[0]->[1] = yy;
[...]
$a[0]->[164] = zz;

$a[1]->[0] = qq;
$a[1]->[1] = rr;
[...]
$a[164]->[164] = vv;

Does this make sense?

I'm calling the row $x and columns $y, so an element in your array will be $array[$x]->[$y]. Is that good?

Okay, your column names will be in row $array[0], so if we find a value less than five in $array[$x]->[$y], we know the column name is in $array[0]->[$y]. Is that good?

for my $x (1..164) { #First row is column names
  for my $y (0..164)  {
    if ($array[$x]->[$y] <= 5) {
        $array[$x]->[$y] = $array[0]->[$y];
    }
  }
}

I'm simply going through all the rows, and for each row, all the columns, and checking the value. If the value is less than or equal to five, I replace it with the column name.

I hope I'm not doing your homework for you.

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GNU awk 4.0 has arrays of arrays too. –  Dimitre Radoulov Nov 11 '11 at 21:49
    
Dimitre - Thanks for letting me know. –  David W. Nov 13 '11 at 3:29

This GNU sed solution might work although it will need scaling up as I only used a 10x10 matrix for testing purposes:

# { echo {a..j};for x in {1..10};do seq 1 10 | shuf |sed 'N;N;N;N;N;N;N;N;N;s/\n/ /g';done; }> test_data
# cat test_data                                                                                 
a b c d e f g h i j
4 5 9 3 6 2 10 8 7 1
3 7 4 2 1 6 10 5 8 9
10 9 3 1 2 7 8 5 6 4
5 10 4 9 7 8 1 3 6 2
8 6 5 9 1 4 3 2 7 10
2 8 9 3 5 6 10 1 4 7
3 9 8 2 1 4 10 6 7 5
3 7 2 1 8 6 10 4 5 9
1 10 8 3 6 5 4 2 7 9
7 2 3 5 6 1 10 4 8 9
# cat test_data |
sed -rn '1{h;d};s/[0-9]{2,}|[6-9]/0/g;G;s/\n|$/ &/g;s/$/&1 2 3 4 5 /;:a;s/^(\S*) (.*\n)(\S* )(.*)/\2\4\1\3/;ta;s/\n//;s/0[^ ]? //g;:b;s/([1-5])(.*)\1(.)/\3\2/;tb;p'
j f d a b      
e d a c h      
d e c j h      
g j h c a      
e h g f c      
h a d i e      
e d a f j      
d c a h i      
a h d g f      
f b c h d   

The sed command works as follows.

The first line of the data file contains the column headings is stored in the hold space then the pattern space (current line) is deleted. For all subsequent data lines all two or more digit numbers and values 6 to 9 are converted to 0. The column names are appended, along with a newline to the data values. Spaces are inserted before the newline and end of string. The data is transformed into a lookup and the sorted values i.e.. 1 2 3 4 5 is prepended to it. The newline is removed along with any 0 values and associated lookups. The values 1 to 5 are replaced by the column names in the lookup.

EDIT:

I may have misunderstood the problem regarding sorting columns or rows, if so it's a minimal fix - replace 1 2 3 4 5 by the original values and perform a numeric sort prior to replacing the numeric data with column names from the lookup.

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