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I need to compare two strings which represent json objects. For testing purposes I need a way to compare these strings ignoring not only the child elements order (which is quite common) but order of elements in array properties of jsons. I.e.:

group: {
    id: 123,
    users: [
       {id: 234, name: John},
       {id: 345, name: Mike}
    ]
}

should be equal to:

group: {
    id: 123,
    users: [
       {id: 345, name: Mike},
       {id: 234, name: John}
    ]
}

Ideally I need some javascript lib, but other approaches welcome too.

share|improve this question
1  
maybe this one would help? stackoverflow.com/questions/4465244/compare-2-json-objects – hummingBird Nov 11 '11 at 19:29

Use JSONAssert

They have a loose assert.

Loose:

JSONAssert.assertEquals(exp, act, false);

Strict:

JSONAssert.assertEquals(exp, act, true);
share|improve this answer
    
This looks like a Java solution, but the OP tagged the question with JavaScript. – threed Nov 19 '15 at 19:35
    
"but other approaches welcome too" this is an other approach :) – kecso Nov 19 '15 at 19:59
    
Touche. You got me. – threed Nov 19 '15 at 20:06

I don't know if such thing exist, but you can implement it yourself.

var group1 = {
    id: 123,
    users: [
       {id: 234, name: "John"},
       {id: 345, name: "Mike"}
    ]
};

var group2 = {
    id: 123,
    users: [
       {id: 345, name: "Mike"},
       {id: 234, name: "John"}
    ]
};

function equal(a, b) {

    if (typeof a !== typeof b) return false;
    if (a.constructor !== b.constructor) return false;

    if (a instanceof Array)
    {
        return arrayEqual(a, b);
    }

    if(typeof a === "object")
    {
        return objectEqual(a, b);
    }

    return a === b;
}

function objectEqual(a, b) {
    for (var x in a)
    {
         if (a.hasOwnProperty(x))
         {
             if (!b.hasOwnProperty(x))
             {
                 return false;
             }

             if (!equal(a[x], b[x]))
             {
                 return false;
             }
         }
    }

    for (var x in b)
    {
        if (b.hasOwnProperty(x) && !a.hasOwnProperty(x))
        {
            return false;
        }
    }

    return true;
}

function arrayEqual(a, b) {
    if (a.length !== b.length)
    {
        return false;
    }

    var i = a.length;

    while (i--)
    {
        var j = b.length;
        var found = false;

        while (!found && j--)
        {
            if (equal(a[i], b[j])) found = true;
        }

        if (!found)
        {
            return false;
        }
    }

    return true;
}

alert(equal(group1, group2))
share|improve this answer

You could slice the arrays, sort them by Id then stringify them to JSON and compare the strings. For a lot of members it should work pretty fast. If you duplicate Ids, it will fail because sort will not change the order.

share|improve this answer

Here is my attempt at a custom implementation:

var equal = (function(){
  function isObject(o){
    return o !== null && typeof o === 'object';
  }
  return function(o1, o2){
    if(!isObject(o1) || !isObject(o2)) return o1 === o2;
    var key, allKeys = {};
    for(key in o1)
      if(o1.hasOwnProperty(key))
        allKeys[key] = key;
    for(key in o2)
      if(o2.hasOwnProperty(key))
        allKeys[key] = key;
    for(key in allKeys){
      if(!equal(o1[key], o2[key])) return false;
    }
    return true;
  }
})();

An example of it with test cases:

var p1 = {
  tags: ['one', 'two', 'three'],
  name: 'Frank',
  age: 24,
  address: {
    street: '111 E 222 W',
    city: 'Provo',
    state: 'Utah',
    zip: '84604'
  }
}
var p2 = {
  name: 'Frank',
  age: 24,
  tags: ['one', 'two', 'three'],
  address: {
    street: '111 E 222 W',
    city: 'Provo',
    state: 'Utah',
    zip: '84604'
  }
}
var p3 = {
  name: 'Amy',
  age: 24,
  tags: ['one', 'two', 'three'],
  address: {
    street: '111 E 222 W',
    city: 'Provo',
    state: 'Utah',
    zip: '84604'
  }
}
var p4 = {
  name: 'Frank',
  age: 24,
  tags: ['one', 'two', 'three'],
  address: {
    street: '111 E 222 W',
    city: 'Payson',
    state: 'Utah',
    zip: '84604'
  }
}
var p5 = {
  name: 'Frank',
  age: 24,
  tags: ['one', 'two'],
  address: {
    street: '111 E 222 W',
    city: 'Provo',
    state: 'Utah',
    zip: '84604'
  }
}

var equal = (function(){
  function isObject(o){
    return o !== null && typeof o === 'object';
  }
  return function(o1, o2){
    if(!isObject(o1) || !isObject(o2)) return o1 === o2;
    var key, allKeys = {};
    for(key in o1)
      if(o1.hasOwnProperty(key))
        allKeys[key] = key;
    for(key in o2)
      if(o2.hasOwnProperty(key))
        allKeys[key] = key;
    for(key in allKeys){
      if(!equal(o1[key], o2[key])) return false;
    }
    return true;
  }
})();

var cases = [
  {name: 'Compare with self', a: p1, b: p1, expected: true},
  {name: 'Compare with identical', a: p1, b: p2, expected: true},
  {name: 'Compare with different', a: p1, b: p3, expected: false},
  {name: 'Compare with different (nested)', a: p1, b: p4, expected: false},
  {name: 'Compare with different (nested array)', a: p1, b: p5, expected: false}
];

function runTests(tests){
  var outEl = document.getElementById('out');
  for(var i=0; i < tests.length; i++){
    var actual = equal(tests[i].a, tests[i].b),
        result = tests[i].expected == actual
          ? 'PASS'
          : 'FAIL';
    outEl.innerHTML += 
      '<div class="test ' + result + '">' + 
        result + ' ' +
        tests[i].name + 
      '</div>';
  }
}
runTests(cases);
body{
  font-family:monospace;
}
.test{
  margin:5px;
  padding:5px;  
}
.PASS{
  background:#EFE;
  border:solid 1px #32E132;
}
.FAIL{
  background:#FEE;  
  border:solid 1px #FF3232;
}
<div id=out></div>

share|improve this answer
    
I would be grateful if anyone discovers an edge case that doesn't work with this solution. – threed Nov 19 '15 at 20:54

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