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I have a list of prices ordered by date. I need to select all monotonously decreasing values. The following code works:

    public static List<DataPoint> SelectDecreasingValues(List<DataPoint> dataPoints)
    {
        var ret = new List<DataPoint>(dataPoints.Count);
        var previousPrice = dataPoints[0].Price;
        for (int i = 0; i < dataPoints.Count; i++)
        {
            if (dataPoints[i].Price <= previousPrice)
            {
                ret.Add(dataPoints[i]);
                previousPrice = dataPoints[i].Price;
            }
        }
        return ret;
    }

However, is there a shorter/cleaner way to accomplish it with Linq?

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where is strips comming from? –  Daniel Hilgarth Nov 11 '11 at 20:16
    
@Daniel Hilgarth: oops, I fixed my example –  Arne Lund Nov 11 '11 at 20:20

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This code is equivalent:

previousPrice = dataPoints[0].Price;
var ret = dataPoints.Where(x => {
                                   if(x.Price <= previousPrice)
                                   { previousPrice = x.Price; return true;}
                                   return false; 
                                }).ToList();

However, if you don't need to have a list, go with plain enumerables and drop the ToList at the end. That way you can make use of the deferred execution feature built into LINQ.


The following code is also equivalent:

DataPoint previous = dataPoints.FirstOrDefault();
var ret = dataPoints.Where(x => x.Price <= previous.Price)
                    .Select(x => previous = x).ToList();

This works because of the deferred execution in LINQ. For each item in dataPoints it will first execute the Where part and then the Select part and only then will it move to the second item in dataPoints.

You need to decide which version you want to use. The second one is not as intention revealing as the first one, because you need to know about the internal workings of LINQ.

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1  
The second code even has another advantage over the OPs code: It doesn't throw if dataPoints is empty. –  Daniel Hilgarth Nov 11 '11 at 20:30
    
@Daniel Hilgarth: your second snippet passes all my unit tests, and I like it! –  Arne Lund Nov 11 '11 at 20:38
public IEnumerable<T> WhereMonotonicDecreasing<T>(
  IEnumerable<T> source,
  Func<T, IComparable> keySelector)
{
  IComparable key;
  bool first = true;
  foreach(T t in source)
  {
    if (first)
    {
      key = keySelector(t);
      yield return t;
      first = false;
    }
    else
    {
      IComparable newKey = keySelector(t);
      if (newKey.CompareTo(key) < 0)
      {
         key = newKey;
         yield return t;
      }
    }
  }
}

Called by:

dataPoints.WhereMonotonicDecreasing(x => x.Price);
share|improve this answer
1  
This is way longer that my original method ;) –  Arne Lund Nov 11 '11 at 20:39
    
Yes, but - you write it once and use it a million times. A good deal compared to writing a "short" query a million times. –  David B Nov 11 '11 at 22:02
    
I see your point, and if I shall need to implement this thing more than once, I will use your approach. –  Arne Lund Nov 14 '11 at 19:19
previousPrice = dataPoints[0];
dataPoints.Where(p => p.Price <= previousPrice.Price)
          .Select(p => previousPrice = p);

You can then use .ToList() if you really need one.

share|improve this answer
    
This will return all values that are smaller than the first item in the list. Not what the OP wanted. –  Daniel Hilgarth Nov 11 '11 at 20:29
    
@DanielHilgarth yes, forgot to fix that part. –  Yuriy Faktorovich Nov 11 '11 at 20:31

How about (untested):

return dataPoints.Take(1)
                 .Concat(dataPoints.Skip(1)
                                   .Zip(dataPoints,
                                          (next, previous) =>
                                           new { Next = next, Previous = previous })
                                   .Where(a => a.Next.Price <= a.Previous.Price)
                                   .Select(a => a.Next))
                 .ToList();

Essentially, this overlays a "one-deferred" version of the sequence over the sequence to produce "next, previous" tuples and then applies the relevant filters on those tuples. The Take(1) is to pick the first item of the sequence, which it appears you always want.

If you don't care for the readability of the variable names, you could shorten it to:

return dataPoints.Take(1)
                 .Concat(dataPoints.Skip(1)
                                   .Zip(dataPoints, Tuple.Create)
                                   .Where(a => a.Item1.Price <= a.Item2.Price)
                                   .Select(a => a.Item1))
                 .ToList();
share|improve this answer
    
Wow. Now that's what I call cryptic and over kill :-) –  Daniel Hilgarth Nov 11 '11 at 20:31
1  
This is way longer that my original method ;) –  Arne Lund Nov 11 '11 at 20:39
    
@Arne: Because of the indentation? –  Ani Nov 11 '11 at 20:41

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