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Given the following expression:

$att['menutext'] = isset($attrib_in['i_menu_text']) ? : $this->getID();

If it evaluates to true, will $att['menutext'] be set to true or $this->getID()?

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This won't execute, it's invalid syntax. Parse error: syntax error, unexpected ':' on line X –  nickb Nov 11 '11 at 20:33
    
Not in PHP 5.3. php.net/manual/en/… –  Jim H. Nov 11 '11 at 20:35
    
That explains why it didn't work on 5.2.5 :) –  nickb Nov 11 '11 at 20:37

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It's just the same as the following

$att['menutext'] = isset($attrib_in['i_menu_text']) ? true : $this->getID();

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3  
Just to clarify for passersby, this shortcut version of the ternery operator returns whatever the condition evaluates to, not just Boolean true in every instance. In this case, the condition would evaluate to true. But if you had $foo = 42 ? : false;, $foo would be assigned 42. –  Wiseguy Nov 11 '11 at 20:43
    
I am particularly impressed with the fact that this answer and comment actually answered the question I meant to ask as well as the one I did ask –  Sinthia V Nov 19 '11 at 23:40

According to this reference:

Since PHP 5.3, it is possible to leave out the middle part of the ternary operator. Expression expr1 ?: expr3 returns expr1 if expr1 evaluates to TRUE, and expr3 otherwise.

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thats clever, thanks –  Jan Højriis Dragsbaek Nov 11 '11 at 20:36

never tested before, but its quite easy to test:

<?php var_dump(TRUE ? : 'F'); ?>

and its says: bool(true)

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This won't execute, it's invalid syntax for PHP < 5.3.

Parse error: syntax error, unexpected ':' on line X

If you want the value to be set to true, then use true:

$att['menutext'] = isset($attrib_in['i_menu_text']) ? true : $this->getID();

Or it may be more likely that you want:

$att['menutext'] = isset($attrib_in['i_menu_text']) ? $attrib_in['i_menu_text'] : $this->getID();
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Yes, in version 5.3+ the middle expression is optional and returns true.

$a = (true ? : 1); // $a evaluates to true.
$a = (false ? : 1); // $a evaluates to 1.
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1  
Just to clarify for passersby, this shortcut version of the ternery operator returns whatever the condition evaluates to, not just Boolean true in every instance. In this case, the condition would evaluate to true. But if you had $foo = 42 ? : false;, $foo would be assigned 42. –  Wiseguy Nov 11 '11 at 20:46

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