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Let's take an example. A "file1" -file has a content "file1", its own name. A "file2"-file has a content "file2", again its own name. The pattern continues until we have covered 77 files. What is the easiest way to do the 77 files?

Since I tend to have hard time in compiling, I sum up some details.

Intructions how to compile the codes

PERMISSIONS: "chmod 700 filename.some_ending"

RUNNING: ". ./filename.some_ending"

How to compile?

  1. Use gcc for C++/C like "gcc filename.c", and then run ". ./a.out"
  2. Use javac for Java like "javac filename.javac", and then run it with "java class" (error?!)
  3. Fortran?
  4. ... more?
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6  
dear god, why??? –  Chad Grant May 1 '09 at 2:33
1  
I need test data to analyse my problem here: stackoverflow.com/questions/809761/…. Besides, I like doing this kind of things :) –  Masi May 1 '09 at 3:03
    
Hah if you made this a community wiki, it might have been a code golf competition. –  Min May 1 '09 at 3:47
    
Min: As you wish. –  Masi May 1 '09 at 3:53
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12 Answers

up vote 18 down vote accepted
#!/bin/bash
for i in {1..77}
do
   echo file$i > file$i
done
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2  
You beat me by 25 seconds T.T –  GManNickG May 1 '09 at 2:33
6  
The {1..77} construct doesn't work for me with GNU bash, version 2.05b.0(1)-release (powerpc-apple-darwin8.0). "for i in seq 1 77" should work more universally. –  Adam Rosenfield May 1 '09 at 3:14
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Python:

for i in range(1,78): open("file" + str(i), "w").write("file" + str(i))
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C++:

#include <sstream>
#include <fstream>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
     for (int i = 1; i <= 77; i++) {
          stringstream s;
          s << "file" << i;
          ofstream out(s.str().c_str());
          out << s.str();
          out.close();
     }
     return 0;
}
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You don't need to call out.close() –  GManNickG May 3 '09 at 20:38
    
@GMan: aren't you supposed, to close the file pointer? –  Ankit May 4 '09 at 2:37
    
@Ankit: No. C++ has RAII –  Niklas B. Jan 2 '13 at 19:32
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C:

#include <stdio.h>

int main() {
    char buffer[8];
    FILE* f;
    int i;
    for(i = 1; i <= 77; i++){
        sprintf(buffer, "file%d", i);
        if((f = fopen(buffer, "w")) != NULL){
            fputs(buffer, f);
            fclose(f);
        }
    }
    return 0;
}
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Java version, for fun.

import java.io.*;

public class HA {
    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        String file = "file";
        for (int i = 1; i <= 77; i++){
            PrintStream out = new PrintStream(new File(file + i));
            out.print(file + i);
            out.close();
        }
    }
}
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Perl:

#!/usr/bin/env perl
for ( my $i = 1; $i <= 77; ++$i )
{
    open( my $fh, '>', 'file' . $i );
    print { $fh } ( 'file' . $i );
    close( $fh );
}
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There's rarely need to use C-style loops in Perl. "for my $i (1..77)" is equivalent, plus you don't have to worry about fencepost errors. –  Dave Sherohman May 1 '09 at 12:51
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I added the extension, assuming the file's gonna have it.

Fortran:

character(11) file_name
do i=1,77
  write(file_name,"('file',i2.2,'.txt')")i
  open(unit=1, file=file_name, status='replace')
  write(1,"(a)")file_name
  close(unit=1)
enddo
end
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Python version for those who prefer readable over terse:

filenames = ("file%(num)d" % vars() for num in range(1, 78))
for filename in filenames:
    open(filename, 'w').write(filename)
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2  
Personally, I think the other python version is more readable. –  Ankit May 1 '09 at 11:13
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C#, why not:

using System.IO;

namespace FileCreator
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            for (int i = 1; i <= 77; i++)
            {
                TextWriter f = new StreamWriter("file" + i);
                f.Write("file" + i);
                f.Close();
            }
        }
    }
}
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Ruby:

77.times { |i| File.open("file#{i+1}", "w") { |f| f.puts "file#{i+1}" } }
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Delphi/Free Pascal

program Create77Files;

{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}

uses
  Classes, SysUtils;

var
  I: Integer;
  S: string;
begin
  for I := 1 to 77 do
  begin
    S:= 'file' + IntToStr(I);
    with TStringStream.Create(S) do
    begin
      SaveToFile(S);
      Free;
    end;
  end;
end.
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Groovy:

77.times{n->n++;new File('file'+n).withWriter{it.writeLine('file'+n)}}
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