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I'm writting a generalized method to use it in a special task at a T4 template. The method should allow me to use specialized types from a general interface. I though about the following signatures:

interface IGreatInterface {
    Object aMethodAlpha<U>(U parameter) where U : IAnInterface;
    Object aMethodBeta(IAnInterface parameter)
}

public class AnInterestingClass : IAnInterface{}

When I try to implement IGreatInterface the compiler flags an error for aMethodBeta() because I've made my T4 to write that method using a subtype of IAnInterface (i.e. I want to implement that method like this: Object aMethodBeta(AnInterestingClass parameter)).

Method aMethodAlpha<U>() can be used but is not as clean as I want because my T4 has to generate some extra code. I (perhaps wrongly) propose that an implementation of that method, which has to be done by a T4, could be
Object aMethodAlpha<AnInterestingClass>(AnInterestingClass parameter).

I'm thinking that generic methods do not support contravariant types but I'm not sure; I suppose that It's the way the compiler prevents the coder to use a specific type having a method not defined in the general type...

  1. Does a generic method have to use the exact type when being implemented?
  2. Is there any trick to change this behavior?
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I don't quite understand your question. Can you post the code that implements IGreatInterface and the specific compiler error? –  phoog Nov 11 '11 at 21:11
2  
@Juan: Just as a side note it helps to mark your updates with an update or something so we see what's changed. –  James Michael Hare Nov 11 '11 at 21:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 14 down vote accepted

This question is quite confusing. Let me see if I can clarify it.

When I try to implement IGreatInterface the compiler flags an error for aMethodBeta() because I've made that method using a subtype of IAnInterface I want to implement that method like this: Object aMethodBeta(AnInterestingClass parameter).

That's not legal. Simplifying somewhat:

class Food {}
class Fruit : Food {}
class Meat : Food {}
interface IEater
{
    void Eat(Food food);
}
class Vegetarian : IEater
{
    public void Eat(Fruit fruit);
}

Class Vegetarian does not fulfill the contract of IEater. You should be able to pass any Food to Eat, but a Vegetarian only accepts Fruit. C# does not support virtual method formal parameter covariance because that is not typesafe.

Now, you might then say, how about this:

interface IFruitEater
{
    void Eat(Fruit fruit);
}
class Omnivore : IFruitEater
{
    public void Eat(Food food);
}

Now we have got type safety; Omnivore can be used as an IFruitEater because an Omnivore can eat fruit, as well as any other food.

Unfortunately, C# does not support virtual method formal parameter type contravariance even though doing so is in theory typesafe. Few languages do support this.

Similarly, C# does not support virtual method return type variance either.

I'm not sure if that actually answered your question or not. Can you clarify the question?

UPDATE:

What about:

interface IEater
{
    void Eat<T>(T t) where T : Food;
}
class Vegetarian : IEater
{
    // I only want to eat fruit!
    public void Eat<Fruit>(Fruit food) { }
}

Nope, that's not legal either. The contract of IEater is that you will provide a method Eat<T> that can take any T that is a Food. You cannot partially implement the contract, any more than you could do this:

interface IAdder
{
    int Add(int x, int y);
}
class Adder : IAdder
{
    // I only know how to add two!
    public int Add(2, int y){ ... }
}

However, you can do this:

interface IEater<T> where T : Food
{
    void Eat(T t);
}
class Vegetarian : IEater<Fruit>
{
    public void Eat(Fruit fruit) { }
}

That is perfectly legal. However, you cannot do:

interface IEater<T> where T : Food
{
    void Eat(T t);
}
class Omnivore : IEater<Fruit>
{
    public void Eat(Food food) { }
}

Because again, C# does not support virtual method formal parameter contravariance or covariance.

Note that C# does support parametric polymorphism covariance when doing so is known to be typesafe. For example, this is legal:

IEnumerable<Fruit> fruit = whatever;
IEnumerable<Food> food = fruit;

A sequence of fruit may be used as a sequence of food. Or,

IEnumerable<Fruit> fruitComparer = whatever;
IComparable<Apples> appleComparer = fruitComparer;

If you have something that can compare any two fruits then it can compare any two apples.

However, this kind of covariance and contravariance is only legal when all of the following are true: (1) the variance is provably typesafe, (2) the author of the type added variance annotations indicating the desired co- and contra-variances, (3) the varying type arguments involved are all reference types, (4) the generic type is either a delegate or an interface.

share|improve this answer
    
(Great answer! this comment will be used to clarify the question later...). Using your example: can I create a signature IEater.Eat<T>(T food) where T : Food and then implement Omnivore.Eat<Fruit>(Fruit food)? without the compiler flagging me for not implementing IEater.Eat<T>(T food)?. From your answer I think it is not possible... –  JPCF Nov 11 '11 at 22:20
    
@JuanPabloContreras: I've added some additional text regarding your comment. –  Eric Lippert Nov 11 '11 at 22:42
    
@EricLippert If possible could you please give your thoughts on this question stackoverflow.com/questions/8109478/… –  Sandeep Nov 13 '11 at 3:56

If you want to inherit from a generic interface, see phoog's answer. If you are talking about trying to implement an interface co-variantly, that leads to my discussion below.

Assume:

internal interface IAnInterface { }

public class SomeSubClass : IAnInterface { }

public class AnotherSubClass : IAnInterface { }

public GreatClass : IGreatInterface { ... }

The problem with trying to implement the interface with a more derived (co-variant) argument is there's no guarante when this is called through an interface that an IAnInterface passed in will be a SomeSubClass instance. This is why it's not allowed directly.

IGreatInterface x = new GreatClass();

x.aMethodBeta(new AnotherSubClass());

IF You could do covariance, this would fail because you would be expecting a SomeSubClass but would get a AnotherSubClass.

What you could do is to do explicit interface implementation:

class GreatInterface : IGreatInterface
{
    // explicitly implement aMethodBeta() when called from interface reference
    object IGreatInterface.aMethodBeta(IAnInterface parameter)
    {
        // do whatever you'd do on IAnInterface itself...
        var newParam = parameter as SomeSubClass;

        if (newParam != null)
        {
            aMethodBeta(newParam);
        }

        // otherwise do some other action...
    }

    // This version is visible from the class reference itself and has the 
    // sub-class parameter
    public object aMethodBeta(SomeSubClass parameter)
    {
        // do whatever
    }
}

Thus, if you did this, your interface supports the generic, the class has a more specific method, but still supports the interface. The main difference is you'd need to handle the case where an unexpected implementation of IAnInterface is passed in.

UPDATE: it sounds like you want something like this:

public interface ISomeInterface
{
    void SomeMethod<A>(A someArgument);
}

public class SomeClass : ISomeInterface
{
    public void SomeMethod<TA>(TA someArgument) where TA : SomeClass
    {

    }
}

This is not allowed, when you implement a generic method from an interface, the constraints must match.

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hmmm... from your answer I can infer that .net doesn't accept subtypes with generic methods... Am I correct? –  JPCF Nov 11 '11 at 21:38
    
@Juan: I'm not sure what you mean by "doesn't accept". Do you mean as arguments? As parameter types? –  James Michael Hare Nov 11 '11 at 21:39
    
@Juan: If you mean can I implement an interface but make the type more derived than the interface type? No, you can't. You can co-variantly, contra-variantly pass/return args, and you can co-variantly, contra-variantly assign interfaces and delegates (if marked appropriately), but not the implementation. –  James Michael Hare Nov 11 '11 at 21:41
    
I'm talking about the type of the method. Suppose I've aMethodAlpha<AType>(...) in an interface. The implementation can be aMethodAlpha<aDerivedType>(...) where aDerivedType : AType? I concluded from your answer that this is not possible and the method implementation has to be aMethodAlpha<aDerivedType>(...). If I'm correct you will get the check only by adding it to your original answer... thanks! –  JPCF Nov 11 '11 at 21:54
    
@Juan: So, you want the interface method to be generic, and the implementation of that interface method to give a more derived form of the generic type placeholder, correct? –  James Michael Hare Nov 11 '11 at 22:01

Maybe you're looking for this:

interface IGreatInterface<in U> where U : IAnInterface
{ 
    Object aMethodAlpha(U parameter);
} 

class SomeClass : IAnInterface { /*...*/ }

class GreatClass : IGreatInterface<SomeClass>
{
    public Object aMethodAlpha(SomeClass parameter) {}
}

EDIT:

Yes, you are right: if you define a generic method in an interface, you can't implement that method with a concrete method using a compatible type.

How about using a delegate (since delegates support co- and contravariance):

[example deleted because I got the variance backwards -- it doesn't work.]

share|improve this answer
    
nope... please read the update... –  JPCF Nov 11 '11 at 21:35

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