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So I want to create a tab system using only CSS.

what I have so far works, but I don't know how to make one tab visible by default.

The tabs:

<section class="tabs">

  <ul>
   <li><a href="#tab1">1</a></li>
   <li><a href="#tab2">2</a></li>
   <li><a href="#tab3">3</a></li>
  </ul>

  <section id="tab1"> content for 1... </section>
  <section id="tab2"> content for 2... </section>
  <section id="tab3"> content for 3... </section>

</section>

and the css (the most important part):

.tabs section{
 display: none;
}

.tabs section:target{
 display: block;
}

So I if I set the section:first-child to block (first tab should be visible by default), then I get two visible sections if there's a anchor in the URL: the first tab, and the target tab...

How can I overcome this problem?

share|improve this question
    
That depends if you're able, or willing, to use JavaScript. Because CSS controls only presentation, not behaviour, it's unable to offer the functionality you require un-aided. –  David Thomas Nov 11 '11 at 21:27
    
I already have javascript that handles tab show/hide, the css is just fallback for browser that have js off. –  Alex Nov 11 '11 at 21:33
    
Are these tabs all on one page? How would the non-JS visitor be able to see the hidden-by-default content? –  KatieK Nov 11 '11 at 22:33
    
by clicking on one of the links, the address turns into site.com/#tabN, which triggers :target on #tabN... –  Alex Nov 11 '11 at 23:10
    
I know you already accepted my answer to your question, but I just wanted you to be sure you checked out my edited solution to show the link as active (as your comment desire noted). –  ScottS Nov 12 '11 at 22:26

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Well, if you make your default your last tab (section:last-child), then I think this could work:

.tabs section,
.tabs section:target ~ section {
   display: none;
}

Using the general sibling selector ~ requires that the element precede the siblings it targets, so hence the reason for the last-child rather than first-child requirement.

EDIT: 11-12-2011, I did find a way for you to highlight your a tags as active! Assuming it meets your particular application. Here is some simple modified code for proof of concept (only tested in FF):

HTML

<section class="tabs">
  <ul class="nav">
   <li><a href="#tab1">1</a></li>
   <li><a href="#tab2">2</a></li>
   <li><a href="#tab3">3</a></li>
  </ul>


  <section id="tab2"><div class="tabActive"></div> content for 2... </section>
  <section id="tab3"><div class="tabActive"></div> content for 3... </section>
  <section id="tab1"><div class="tabActive"></div> content for 1... </section>

</section>

CSS

.nav {
    position: relative;
    z-index: 2;
    margin: 10px .5em 0;
}
.nav li {
    padding: .5em;
    width: 2em;
    text-align: center;
    float: left;
}

.tabs section,
.tabs section:target ~ section {
   display: none;
}

.tabs section:target,
.tabs section:last-child {
    display: block;
    clear: left;
    margin: 0 .5em;
    min-width: 300px;  /* for show only */
    min-height: 200px; /* for show only */
    border: 1px solid black;   
    position: relative;
    z-index: 1;
    padding: 10px;
}

.tabActive { /* set for tab 1 */
    width: 2em;
    height: 2em;
    position: absolute;
    top: -2em;
    left: .5em;
    border: 1px solid black;
    border-bottom: transparent;
    background-color: inherit;
    margin-top: -1px; /* top border height */
    margin-left: -1px; /* left border width */
}

#tab1 {background-color: cyan;}
#tab2 {background-color: yellow;}
#tab3 {background-color: pink;}

#tab2 .tabActive {left: 3.5em;}
#tab3 .tabActive {left: 6.5em;}
share|improve this answer
    
it works, thanks :) Now I need to find a way to make the links look "active" –  Alex Nov 12 '11 at 11:07
1  
Good. I don't think there is a non-scripting way of having the link look active without you reformatting your html to have the a elements inside their respective section elements (which, of course, creates issues with your displaying them in the manner that you currently are). At some point or another you just have to give up on the user experience when someone has javacript turned off. –  ScottS Nov 12 '11 at 11:56
    
My comment above was wrong. See my edited solution above for how to highlight the links as active even though they are not in the section element. –  ScottS Nov 12 '11 at 16:38
    
thanks, I'll check it out, though I don't think it will suit my case, because I use images and stuff for the graphics... –  Alex Nov 13 '11 at 2:17

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