Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an OO hierarchy with docstrings that take as much maintenance as the code itself. E.g.,

class Swallow(object):
    def airspeed(self):
        """Returns the airspeed (unladen)"""
        raise NotImplementedError

class AfricanSwallow(Swallow):
    def airspeed(self):
        # whatever

Now, the problem is that AfricanSwallow.airspeed does not inherit the superclass method's docstring. I know I can keep the docstring using the template method pattern, i.e.

class Swallow(object):
    def airspeed(self):
        """Returns the airspeed (unladen)"""
        return self._ask_arthur()

and implementing _ask_arthur in each subclass. However, I was wondering whether there's another way to have docstrings be inherited, perhaps some decorator that I hadn't discovered yet?

share|improve this question
5  
The example alone would be worth +1 (you see far too few Python references outside the official documentation). Luckily, the remaining question also justifies an upvote ;) –  delnan Nov 11 '11 at 21:30
    
Have a look at google.com/search?q=python+inherit+docstring -- there are lots of solutions. –  Sven Marnach Nov 11 '11 at 21:36
2  
It should be possible to write a class decorator that goes through all the methods to see if their __doc__ is None and if so borrows the super __doc__. Don't have time to try it right now... See also stackoverflow.com/questions/2025562/… –  wberry Nov 11 '11 at 23:07
    
@wberry: class decorators aren't an option, as I'm targeting Python 2.5. Sorry, I should have said that earlier. –  larsmans Nov 11 '11 at 23:12

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Write a function in a class-decorator style to do the copying for you. In Python2.5, you can apply it directly after the class is created. In later versions, you can apply with the @decorator notation.

Here's a first cut at how to do it:

def fix_docs(cls):
    for name, func in vars(cls).items():
        if not func.__doc__:
            print func, 'needs doc'
            for parent in cls.__bases__:
                parfunc = getattr(parent, name)
                if parfunc and getattr(parfunc, '__doc__', None):
                    func.__doc__ = parfunc.__doc__
                    break
    return cls


class Animal:
    def walk(self):
        'Walk like a duck'

class Dog(Animal):
    def walk(self):
        pass

Dog = fix_docs(Dog)
print Dog.walk.__doc__

In newer Python versions, the last part is even more simple and beautiful:

@fix_docs
class Dog(Animal):
    def walk(self):
        pass

This is a Pythonic technique that exactly matches the design of existing tools in the standard library. For example, the functools.total_ordering class decorator add missing rich comparison methods to classes. And for another example, the functools.wraps decorator copies metadata from one function to another.

share|improve this answer

This is a variation on Paul McGuire's DocStringInheritor metaclass.

  1. It inherits a parent member's docstring if the child member's docstring is empty.
  2. It inherits a parent class docstring if the child class docstring is empty.
  3. It can inherit the docstring from any class in any of the base classes's MROs, just like regular attribute inheritance.
  4. Unlike with a class decorator, the metaclass is inherited, so you only need to set the metaclass once in some top-level base class, and docstring inheritance will occur throughout your OOP hierarchy.

class DocStringInheritor(type):
    '''A variation on
    http://groups.google.com/group/comp.lang.python/msg/26f7b4fcb4d66c95
    by Paul McGuire
    '''
    def __new__(meta, name, bases, clsdict):
        if not('__doc__' in clsdict and clsdict['__doc__']):
            for mro_cls in (mro_cls for base in bases for mro_cls in base.mro()):
                doc=mro_cls.__doc__
                if doc:
                    clsdict['__doc__']=doc
                    break
        for attr, attribute in clsdict.items():
            if not attribute.__doc__:
                for mro_cls in (mro_cls for base in bases for mro_cls in base.mro()
                                if hasattr(mro_cls, attr)):
                    doc=getattr(getattr(mro_cls,attr),'__doc__')
                    if doc:
                        attribute.__doc__=doc
                        break
        return type.__new__(meta, name, bases, clsdict)

import unittest
import sys

class Test(unittest.TestCase):
    def test_null(self):
        class Foo(object):
            def frobnicate(self): pass
        class Bar(Foo):
            __metaclass__=DocStringInheritor
        self.assertEqual(Bar.__doc__,object.__doc__)
        self.assertEqual(Bar().__doc__,object.__doc__)
        self.assertEqual(Bar.frobnicate.__doc__,None)        
    def test_inherit_from_parent(self):
        class Foo(object):
            'Foo'
            def frobnicate(self):
                'Frobnicate this gonk.'
        class Bar(Foo):
            __metaclass__=DocStringInheritor
        self.assertEqual(Foo.__doc__,'Foo')
        self.assertEqual(Foo().__doc__,'Foo')                    
        self.assertEqual(Bar.__doc__,'Foo')
        self.assertEqual(Bar().__doc__,'Foo')        
        self.assertEqual(Bar.frobnicate.__doc__,'Frobnicate this gonk.')
    def test_inherit_from_mro(self):
        class Foo(object):
            'Foo'
            def frobnicate(self):
                'Frobnicate this gonk.'
        class Bar(Foo): pass
        class Baz(Bar):
            __metaclass__=DocStringInheritor
        self.assertEqual(Baz.__doc__,'Foo')
        self.assertEqual(Baz().__doc__,'Foo')
        self.assertEqual(Baz.frobnicate.__doc__,'Frobnicate this gonk.')         
    def test_inherit_metaclass_(self):
        class Foo(object):
            'Foo'
            def frobnicate(self):
                'Frobnicate this gonk.'
        class Bar(Foo):
            __metaclass__=DocStringInheritor
        class Baz(Bar): pass
        self.assertEqual(Baz.__doc__,'Foo')
        self.assertEqual(Baz().__doc__,'Foo')
        self.assertEqual(Baz.frobnicate.__doc__,'Frobnicate this gonk.')         


if __name__ == '__main__':
    sys.argv.insert(1,'--verbose')
    unittest.main(argv = sys.argv)    
share|improve this answer
    
And for Python 3? –  Neil G Nov 12 '11 at 0:08
2  
@NeilG: I updated the code to be compatible with Python3. The only change necessary (now) is to define Baz with class Baz(Bar,metaclass=DocStringInheritor) instead of __metaclass__ = DocStringInheritor in the class body. –  unutbu Nov 12 '11 at 0:41
1  
A metaclass is a bit of overkill for this :-) –  Raymond Hettinger Nov 12 '11 at 0:54
2  
It's only overkill in case there is a simpler solution which has no drawbacks. –  Alfe May 24 '13 at 10:08

The following adaptation also handles properties and mixin classes. I also came across a situation where I had to use func.__func__ (for "instancemethod"s), but I'm not completely sure why the other solutions didn't encouter that problem.

def inherit_docs(cls):
    for name in dir(cls):
        func = getattr(cls, name)
        if func.__doc__: 
            continue
        for parent in cls.mro()[1:]:
            if not hasattr(parent, name):
                continue
            doc = getattr(parent, name).__doc__
            if not doc: 
                continue
            try:
                # __doc__'s of properties are read-only.
                # The work-around below wraps the property into a new property.
                if isinstance(func, property):
                    # We don't want to introduce new properties, therefore check
                    # if cls owns it or search where it's coming from.
                    # With that approach (using dir(cls) instead of var(cls))
                    # we also handle the mix-in class case.
                    wrapped = property(func.fget, func.fset, func.fdel, doc)
                    clss = filter(lambda c: name in vars(c).keys() and not getattr(c, name).__doc__, cls.mro())
                    setattr(clss[0], name, wrapped)
                else:
                    try:
                        func = func.__func__ # for instancemethod's
                    except:
                        pass
                    func.__doc__ = doc
            except: # some __doc__'s are not writable
                pass
            break
    return cls
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.