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Could someone please explain why following program will output "4,6" instead of "4,4".

MainProgram()
{
  int x = 2;
  int y = 0;

  parse(4, out y);
  Console.Write(y + ",");
  y = y + parse(x, out y);
  Console.Write(y);
}

int parse(int x, out int y)
{
    y = x;
    return y;
}

Many thanks!

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2  
FYI - Eric Lippert has a nice post about this exact issue: blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2008/05/23/… (Look at the "Order of evaluation" section) –  Reed Copsey Nov 11 '11 at 21:39
4  
Why are you writing code this crazy in the first place? –  Raymond Chen Nov 11 '11 at 21:43
3  
I think you'd do better to explain why it is that you think that 4,4 is a sensible output, and then we can point out your mistake. Somewhere your chain of reasoning is going wrong. –  Eric Lippert Nov 11 '11 at 21:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I assume you're really interested in the second call to parse, right?

The operands of + are evaluated from left to right, then the addition takes place, then the final assignment takes place.

This line:

y = y + parse(x, out y);

is logically:

int lhs = y;
// Now lhs = 4, x = 2, y = 4
int rhs = parse(x, out y);
// Now rhs = 2, x = 2, y = 2
y = lhs + rhs;
// Now y = 6

Does that help you?

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In the expression y + parse(x, out y) the value of y before the call to parse is captured as part of expression evaluation, then parse(x, out y) is called which modifies the value of y after the fact. So the expression evaluates as 4 + 2.

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I don't see a problem here. First 4 is assigned to y. Then the 2 from the return value of parse() is added to it. The result 6 is finally assigned to again y. First, y before "+" is evaluated (4) and then parse() after "+" is evaluated (2), finally 4+2 is assigned to y.

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