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I'm working on some Java software which entails encrypting and decrypting information on both ends of a network connection using two separate pieces of software. To ease this, I have one class, Cryptographer, that handles the encryption of data. As of right now, the Controller (one side of the connection) and the Agent (the other side) both use this class to generate a SecretKey based on a password shared between the two programs.

The key is generated in this function of the Cryptographer class:

public SecretKey generateKey(String key) {
    this._paramSpec = new PBEParameterSpec(this.SALT, this.ITERATION_COUNT);
    PBEKeySpec spec = new PBEKeySpec(key.toCharArray());
    SecretKeyFactory fac = null;
    try {
        fac = SecretKeyFactory.getInstance("PBEWithMD5AndDES");
    } catch (NoSuchAlgorithmException ex) {
        ex.printStackTrace();
        System.err.println("[ERR] Cryptographer could not create a SecretKeyFactory due to an unsupported algorithm.");
    }
    try {
        if (fac == null)
            return null;
        return fac.generateSecret(spec);
    } catch (InvalidKeySpecException ex) {
        System.err.println("[ERR] Cryptographer could not generate a SecretKey due to an invalid Key Specification.");
        ex.printStackTrace();
        return null;
    }
}

The encryption itself takes place in the encrypt function:

public byte[] encrypt(byte[] message) {
    try {
        this._cipher.init(Cipher.ENCRYPT_MODE, this._key, this._paramSpec);
    } catch (InvalidKeyException ex) {
        System.err.println("[ERR] Cryptographer could not encrypt a message because the provided key is invalid.");
        ex.printStackTrace();
        return new byte[0];
    } catch (InvalidAlgorithmParameterException ex) {
        System.err.println("[ERR] Cryptographer could not encrypt a message because the parameters are invalid.");
        ex.printStackTrace();
        return new byte[0];
    }
    try {
        return this._cipher.doFinal(message);
    } catch (IllegalBlockSizeException ex) {
        System.err.println("[ERR] Cryptographer could not encrypt a message due to an illegal block size.");
        ex.printStackTrace();
        return new byte[0];
    } catch (BadPaddingException ex) {
        System.err.println("[ERR] Cryptographer could not encrypt a message due to bad padding.");
        ex.printStackTrace();
        return new byte[0];
    }
}

And it gets decrypted by the decrypt function:

public byte[] decrypt(byte[] message) {
    try {
        this._cipher.init(Cipher.DECRYPT_MODE, this._key, this._paramSpec);
    } catch (InvalidKeyException ex) {
        System.err.println("[ERR] Cryptographer could not decrypt a message because the provided key is invalid.");
        return new byte[0];
    } catch (InvalidAlgorithmParameterException ex) {
        System.err.println("[ERR] Cryptographer could not decrypt a message because the parameters are invalid.");
    }
    try {
        return this._cipher.doFinal(message);
    } catch (IllegalBlockSizeException ex) {
        System.err.println("[ERR] Cryptographer could not decrypt a message due to an illegal block size.");
        return new byte[0];
    } catch (BadPaddingException ex) {
        System.err.println("[ERR] Cryptographer could not decrypt a message due to bad padding.");
        return new byte[0];
    }
}

Encryption seems to work fine, but when I try to decrypt a serialized object on the receiving end, the InvalidKeyException gets thrown. Comparing the keys independently generated on the Controller and the Agent shows that, although they are sourced in the same password, they are not generating identical keys.

Now, I am new to encryption in Java, so it's entirely possible I'm doing something wrong here. It seems like there is a random element to this that I'm missing. The goal is to get each side of the connection to generate an identical key from identical passwords. So is there anything I'm doing that's obviously wrong? If you need to see more code, let me know. I'll be happy to post it.

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1  
Perhaps you're not using the same salt? –  CodesInChaos Nov 11 '11 at 21:44

1 Answer 1

The InvalidKeyException being thrown indicates to me that I would look at how the key is being used on the receiving end. Are you storing it in a database or file? Are you sure it is in the same encoding that was used to encrypt the data?

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The password used to generate the key is stored in plaintext, then read into the application and passed through the key generation function. –  GradysGhost Nov 14 '11 at 14:47

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