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What is the correct way to preserve a this javascript reference in an event handler stored inside the object's prototype? I'd like to stay away from creating temp vars like '_this' or 'that' and I can't use a framework like jQuery. I saw a lot of people talk about using a 'bind' function but was unsure of how to implement it in my given scenario.

var Example = function(foo,bar){
    this.foo = foo;
    this.bar = bar;
};
Example.prototype.SetEvent = function(){
    this.bar.onclick = this.ClickEvent;
};
Example.prototype.ClickEvent = function(){
    console.log(this.foo); // logs undefined because 'this' is really 'this.bar'
};
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3 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

I find bind() being the cleanest solution so far:

this.bar.onclick = this.ClickEvent.bind(this);

BTW the other this is called that by convention very often.

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1  
I hate creating a reference to this called "that" (a la Crockford). I prefer "instance" (a la Stefanov), or "me" (a la ExtJS) –  George Jempty Nov 11 '11 at 22:04
1  
Actually, I hate creating this references, no matter how are they named. But agree, that isn't the best naming. –  Tomasz Nurkiewicz Nov 11 '11 at 22:08
    
I use 'self', but found just recently that is a name clash with a top-level property in WebWorkers. Not that you can't have the same name, but it does confuse things. Also, I find the name 'that' to be quite the opposite to 'this' –  Matt Nov 11 '11 at 22:08
    
@GeorgeJempty that is just a personal preference –  Ibu Nov 11 '11 at 22:08
1  
this of course doesn't work in old IE (8 and older) –  Keith K Jul 17 '13 at 8:04
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Check out the MDN document on bind: https://developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Function/bind

Using this functionality, you can change the scope (what this is):

Example.prototype.SetEvent = function(){
    this.bar.onclick = this.ClickEvent.bind(this);
};

Be aware, however, that this is a new addition to EMCA and thus may not be supported in all user agents. There is a pollyfill available at the MDN document linked above.

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The problem with bind is that is only supported by IE9+.

If you need a cross-browser solution, you should use jQuery.proxy:

$(this.bar).on('click', $.proxy(this.ClickEvent, this));

This is even more helpful if you want to remove the event handler later, because when a function goes through the proxy method, jQuery generates a new guid value and then applies that guid to both the core function as well as the resultant proxy function, so that you can use the original function reference to unbind an event handler callback that has been proxied:

$(this.bar).off('click', this.ClickEvent);
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