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I'm having an issue with Prolog's delete predicate. The easiest way is just a quick example:

?- delete([(1,1),(1,2),(3,2)],(1,_),List).
List = [ (1, 2), (3, 2)].

I would expect (1,2) to also be deleted, since (1,_) unifies with (1,2) and the SWIPL help says " Delete all members of List1 that simultaneously unify with Elem and unify the result with List2."

Why is this and how do I accomplish what I really want, that is deleting everything that unifies with (1,_)?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

" Delete all members of List1 that simultaneously unify with Elem and unify the result with List2."

(1,X) first unifies with (1,1). therefore, X is unified with 1 and cannot be unified with 2 to delete (1,2). so the problem is not that it does not delete all of the members; it's that it doesnt unify simultaneously with (1,2) and (1,1) (try delete([(1,1),(1,2),(1,1),(3,2)],(1,_),List).

btw, according to the swi-prolog manual:

delete(?List1, ?Elem, ?List2)
Is true when Lis1, with all occurences of Elem deleted results in List2.

also, delete/3 is deprecated:

There are too many ways in which one might want to delete elements from a list to justify the name. Think of matching (= vs. ==), delete first/all, be deterministic or not.

So the easiest way is to write your own predicate. Something like:

my_delete(Pattern,[Pattern|T],TD):-
   my_delete(Pattern,T,TD).
my_delete(Pattern,[H|T],[H|TD]):-
   my_delete(Pattern,T,TD).

perhaps?

check exclude/3, include/3, partition/4

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