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How do you test if the given hostname really exists in Java?

The problem is with some DNS services like Opendns which will return IP address even for non-existent DNS entries and, therefore, InetAddress.getByName( host) will always return something.

However, the host command is able to detect it somehow:

~$ host owqieyuqowiery.com
owqieyuqowiery.com has address 67.215.77.132
Host owqieyuqowiery.com not found: 3(NXDOMAIN)
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1  
does this project help? dnsjava.org/dnsjava-current/examples.html – r0ast3d Nov 11 '11 at 22:38
    
if you can't trust the answers from OpenDNS - ** don't use them! ** – Alnitak Nov 13 '11 at 3:52
    
@Alnitak That doesn't help since I do not control where is my software hosted. – Viliam Nov 13 '11 at 21:30
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Depends on what you mean by "really exists." Do you mean that it's a registered domain, with a website behind it? A host name is just a more easily readable/memorable form vs. an IP address for a given system. In other words, I could have a domain registered (which is just a publicly accessible short name for a system somewhere), and not host a website on a server that said domain points to, and that doesn't make the domain any less "real".

if you just want to lookup A records, here's a solution:

If you want to know what host does, which might shed some light on why it does what it does, there's some information on it here: http://linux.die.net/man/1/host Basically when this fails, it means the DNS lookup failed. That is, the DNS server(s) that host connected to in order to lookup that domain returned zero results.

Also, host returns more than just the DNS A record (which is what is used for websites). It will also give you MX (mail server) records, etc.

Ex:

$ host google.com
google.com has address 74.125.225.48
google.com has address 74.125.225.49
google.com has address 74.125.225.50
google.com has address 74.125.225.51
google.com has address 74.125.225.52
google.com mail is handled by 20 alt1.aspmx.l.google.com.
google.com mail is handled by 30 alt2.aspmx.l.google.com.
google.com mail is handled by 40 alt3.aspmx.l.google.com.
google.com mail is handled by 50 alt4.aspmx.l.google.com.
google.com mail is handled by 10 aspmx.l.google.com.
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I basically need to know if it has A record in DNS. – Viliam Nov 11 '11 at 22:34
    
Ah, I updated my answer to point to some example code that someone wrote. – jefflunt Nov 11 '11 at 22:39

Use the InetAddress.getByName(address).isReachable(timeout); instead.

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This is a pretty straight forward way of doing it, but will only tell you if it's connect-able via ICMP request, or TCP connection on port 7, as opposed to telling you whether or not DNS records for the specified domain exist. docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/net/… – jefflunt Nov 11 '11 at 22:43
    
The thing is that isReachable will return true for any hostname, because it would test Opendns' servers. – Viliam Nov 11 '11 at 22:46

If you cannot trust the locally configured resolver (perhaps because it lies about domains that don't exist) the only alternative is to directly query the authoritative name server(s) for the domain in question.

For Java this should be possible using the dnsjava library.

You would need to start at the root name servers, and follow the referral chain down (in the same manner as a normal recursive server) to find the appropriate authoritative name server.

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That's great advice. Do you have example code that does that using dnsjava? – Benjamin Muschko Apr 25 '12 at 19:18

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