Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I was reading about rem units in CSS3, and was a little confused. If you use rem, do you still use em or does that replace it?

For example:

.selector {
    margin-bottom:24px;
    margin-bottom:2.4rem;
    font-size:16px;
    font-size:1.6rem;
}

or

.selector {
    margin-bottom:24px;
    margin-bottom:2.4em;
    margin-bottom:2.4rem;
}

Just trying to figure out if rem takes the place of em, or if it's just another unit.

share|improve this question
    
Include links for the greater good :) –  user166390 Nov 11 '11 at 22:54
2  
snook.ca/archives/html_and_css/font-size-with-rem covers the differences between rem and em. –  mjwills Nov 11 '11 at 22:56
4  
I think REM split up dude. –  Paul D. Waite Nov 12 '11 at 0:59

3 Answers 3

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Rem is the em size for the root (html) element. That means once you define the html element's font-size, you can define all rem units relative to that.

For example:

html { font-size: 62.5%; } 
body { font-size: 1.4rem; } /* =14px */
h1   { font-size: 2.4rem; } /* =24px */

Rem is supported in Safari 5, Chrome, Firefox 3.6+, and even Internet Explorer, but for older browsers you still have to use em, percent or px.

share|improve this answer
2  
The main difference is that rem allows you to set font-size relative to the root font size (as above) of the html element, not relative to the font-size of a parent element. IE support? >= 9. –  Dave Everitt Dec 31 '12 at 14:01
8  
If you're going to lift code from the web, it's polite to provide the source: snook.ca/archives/html_and_css/font-size-with-rem Or was it Snook who took it from here?? –  Bernhard Hofmann Feb 20 '13 at 11:22
    
Use both px and rem. like in the above code set font-size: 14px; font-size 1.4rem. rem will work for modern browsers and px works for browsers in which rem is not supported. (source: snook.ca) –  Orahmax Jan 10 at 7:32

No, it’s a different unit. em is based on the font-size of the parent, while rem is based on the root font-size, which I believe is the font-size of the html element.

share|improve this answer
    
So, is both of the example I had up correct? How would you properly use REM? –  jfrosty Nov 11 '11 at 23:04
3  
Either could be correct depending on your intent. The thing is 2.4em is not necessarily the same as 2.4rem, they get their base valuee form different elements, so if those elements have different font-sizes then your margin will be different. –  prodigitalson Nov 11 '11 at 23:12

Rem is just one more unit, it doesn't replace em like em didn't replace pixel.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.