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If I have a date, say 11/05/2011, and a time, 5:30PM, is there an easy way to convert this to a datetime object to put in a datetime database column? Or should I store it completely differently?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted
> rails g model A a:datetime
  invoke  active_record
  create    db/migrate/20111112023850_create_as.rb
  create    app/models/a.rb
  invoke    test_unit
  create      test/unit/a_test.rb
  create      test/fixtures/as.yml

> rake db:migrate
==  CreateAs: migrating =======================================================
-- create_table(:as)
   -> 0.0011s
==  CreateAs: migrated (0.0012s) ==============================================

> rails c
Loading development environment (Rails 3.1.0)
ruby-1.8.7-p299 :001 > rec = A.new
 => #<A id: nil, a: nil, created_at: nil, updated_at: nil> 
ruby-1.8.7-p299 :002 > a = "11/05/2011"
 => "11/05/2011" 
ruby-1.8.7-p299 :003 > b = "5:30PM"
 => "5:30PM" 
ruby-1.8.7-p299 :012 > rec.a = DateTime.parse( "#{a} #{b}" )
 => Sat, 05 Nov 2011 17:30:00 +0000 

ruby-1.8.7-p299 :013 > rec.save
  SQL (32.2ms)  INSERT INTO "as" ("a", "created_at", "updated_at") VALUES (?, ?, ?)  [["a", Sat, 05 Nov 2011 17:30:00 UTC +00:00], ["created_at", Sat, 12 Nov 2011 02:43:05 UTC +00:00], ["updated_at", Sat, 12 Nov 2011 02:43:05 UTC +00:00]]
 => true 

note: the date was parsed as UTC without a timezone offset

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Something like this would work.

datetime = DateTime.new(2011,11,05,17,30);
datetime.to_s(:db)

I don't know exactly if you meant the date and time were two separate strings

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