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I have several TableLayoutPanels, each of which displays a category of name/value information in two columns - one with informational labels, and one with data labels.

In each one, I've set the first column to autosize and right-aligned all the labels, which works just fine. However, it works separately to each TableLayoutPanel (obviously), and looks something like this:

TableLayoutPanel 1:

+--------+--------+
| Name 1 | Data 1 |
+--------+--------+
| Name 2 | Data 2 |
+--------+--------+
| Name 3 | Data 3 |
+--------+--------+

TableLayoutPanel 2:

+------------------+--------+
|      Long Name 1 | Data 1 |
+------------------+--------+
| Very Long Name 2 | Data 2 |
+------------------+--------+
|      Long Name 3 | Data 3 |
+------------------+--------+

I'm looking for a way to consider all of the name labels when autosizing all of the first columns, so it looks like this:

TableLayoutPanel 1:

+------------------+--------+
|           Name 1 | Data 1 |
+------------------+--------+
|           Name 2 | Data 2 |
+------------------+--------+
|           Name 3 | Data 3 |
+------------------+--------+

TableLayoutPanel 2:

+------------------+--------+
|      Long Name 1 | Data 1 |
+------------------+--------+
| Very Long Name 2 | Data 2 |
+------------------+--------+
|      Long Name 3 | Data 3 |
+------------------+--------+

I can't put all the data into one table, because each table represents a different category of information, and is inside a custom control with a collection of collapsible panels (so you can show or hide each category separately).

I've been trying to achieve this by overriding the container controls OnLayout(), setting all of the TableLayoutPanels' first columns to autosize, getting all of their widths, finding the maximum, and then settings all of their first columns to a fixed size of the greatest width. This works, but looks horrible every time layout occurs as all the columns jump to autosize and then back to fixed size.

I'm assuming I'm going to have to hook ControlAdded and ControlRemoved for each table, and then SizeChanged for each child control, to know when the size of any child control changed, and then manually set the column width somehow, but I'm not sure how to reliably get the correct widths.

I tried a variation of the first method - using GetPreferredSize() on all the controls in the first columns, to attempt to find the largest width, and then setting all first columns to a fixed size, but it seemed to return widths that were slightly to small. Should I be applying some extra spacing?

Does anyone know any way of asking the TableLayoutPanel to perform autosize calculations without it actually applying them visually? Or perhaps, lying to the tables to 'pretend' that there is a control of a certain width, just so it takes it into account? I can't add actual controls, since it will then want to allocate more cells for them. I tried looking at the source with ILSpy, but well, it isn't pretty. Seems most of the work is done by TableLayout class, which is, of course, internal, and I couldn't follow what it was doing.

Thanks for any ideas...

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1  
I know you can determine how long your text will be based on the font and text. Can you do that on all of your text to find the longest, and then manually set the widths of the first columns for all of your layout panels? –  Daryl Nov 12 '11 at 3:22
1  
Good job on the ascii tables by they way... –  Daryl Nov 12 '11 at 3:23
    
Too bad you can't use WPF. This is trivial in WPF. –  Ritch Melton Nov 12 '11 at 6:22
    
@Daryl: by I know you can do you mean "you know how", or "I know how"? Your idea is viable, but maybe you should exemplify it by some code. –  Gert Arnold Nov 12 '11 at 21:28
    
@Daryl: I think that's basically what I was getting by using GetPreferredSize() on the labels - it seemed to give widths that were just slightly too small for the widest element, so I can only assume I'm neglecting to account for a few pixels of padding or something, though I'm not sure from where. I guess I can just +8 to the width I get or something, but it would be nice to do it 'properly' if there is a way. Also I was hoping to find a general solution where the controls were not necessarily labels... perhaps being a bit too hopeful though, measuring text would solve my immediate problem. –  Ashley Nov 13 '11 at 1:29

3 Answers 3

You can use the Graphics.Measurestring to determine the length in pixels without actually drawing it. There are some slight imperfections with it, so you may think about adding or removing some padding. After a test or two, you can get pretty close. That's as proper of a way as I know of, and it doesn't involve the text being in a label.

Also, trying to find a way to get the TableLayoutPanel to calculate sizes without displaying it visually just sounds like you're trying to hack it into doing something it wasn't designed to.

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I stuck with GetPreferredSize(), since it can work with any control, with or without text. Thanks for the suggestion though. –  Ashley Nov 13 '11 at 21:30
up vote 0 down vote accepted

It turned out the width returned by GetPreferredSize() was useful, it was just 'too late'; I was working out the correct size and returning it within code that was called from the TableLayoutPanels' OnLayout() method, and setting the column width there has no effect until the next layout.

I had a solution that used a separate Component implementing IExtenderProvider which could be used to join tables together, but due to the issue above it always lagged behind control changes. Even hooking SizeChanged on all the child controls, the TableLayoutPanel gets the event first, and starts layout.

So I couldn't see any other way but to override the layout process itself. I tried creating a LayoutEngine that performed the necessary calculations, resized the columns, then delegated the actual layout work to the old layout engine, but unfortunately Control.LayoutEngine is read-only, and TableLayoutPanel doesn't even use a backing field, it just returns another object directly, so I couldn't even get around it by using reflection to assign the private backing field.

In the end I had to resort to subclassing the control, to override OnLayout(). Here is the result:

public class SynchronizedTableLayoutPanel : TableLayoutPanel
    {
    /// <summary>
    /// Specifies a key used to group <see cref="SynchronizedTableLayoutPanel"/>s together.
    /// </summary>
    public String SynchronizationKey
        {
        get { return _SynchronizationKey; }
        set
            {
            if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(_SynchronizationKey))
                RemoveSyncTarget(this);

            _SynchronizationKey = value;

            if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(value))
                AddSyncTarget(this);
            }
        } private String _SynchronizationKey;

    #region OnLayout(), Recalculate()

    protected override void OnLayout(LayoutEventArgs levent)
        {
        if (ColumnCount > 0 && !String.IsNullOrEmpty(SynchronizationKey))
            {
            Recalculate();
            ColumnStyles[0] = new ColumnStyle(SizeType.Absolute, GetMaxWidth(SynchronizationKey));
            }

        base.OnLayout(levent);
        }

    public void Recalculate()
        {
        var LargestWidth = Enumerable.Range(0, RowCount)
            .Select(i => GetControlFromPosition(0, i))
            .Where(c => c != null)
            .Select(c => (Int32?)((c.AutoSize ? c.GetPreferredSize(new Size(Width, 0)).Width : c.Width)+ c.Margin.Horizontal))
            .Max();

        SetMaxWidth(this, LargestWidth.GetValueOrDefault(0));
        }

    #endregion

    #region (Static) Data, cctor, AddSyncTarget(), RemoveSyncTarget(), SetMaxWidth(), GetMaxWidth()

    private static readonly Dictionary<SynchronizedTableLayoutPanel, Int32> Data;

    static SynchronizedTableLayoutPanel()
        {
        Data = new Dictionary<SynchronizedTableLayoutPanel, Int32>();
        }

    private static void AddSyncTarget(SynchronizedTableLayoutPanel table)
        {
        Data.Add(table, 0);
        }

    private static void RemoveSyncTarget(SynchronizedTableLayoutPanel table)
        {
        Data.Remove(table);
        }

    private static void SetMaxWidth(SynchronizedTableLayoutPanel table, Int32 width)
        {
        Data[table] = width;

        foreach (var pair in Data.ToArray())
            if (pair.Key.SynchronizationKey == table.SynchronizationKey && pair.Value != width)
                pair.Key.PerformLayout();
        }

    private static Int32 GetMaxWidth(String key)
        {
        var MaxWidth = Data
            .Where(p => p.Key.SynchronizationKey == key)
            .Max(p => (Int32?) p.Value);

        return MaxWidth.GetValueOrDefault(0);
        }

    #endregion
    }

This version only cares about the first column, but it could be adapted to synchronise other columns, or rows.

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This approach does not flicker or cause jumps with sizing:

public partial class Form1 : Form
{
    private readonly Timer _timer = new Timer();

    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();

        _timer.Interval = 500;
        _timer.Tick += (o, ea) => UpdateWithRandomSizes();
        _timer.Start();
    }

    private void UpdateWithRandomSizes()
    {
        var rand = new Random();
        label1.Text = new string('A', rand.Next(10));
        label2.Text = new string('B', rand.Next(10));
        label3.Text = new string('C', rand.Next(10));
        label4.Text = new string('D', rand.Next(10));

        tableLayoutPanel1.ColumnStyles[0].SizeType = SizeType.AutoSize;
        tableLayoutPanel2.ColumnStyles[0].SizeType = SizeType.AutoSize;
        var width1 = tableLayoutPanel1.GetColumnWidths()[0];
        var width2 = tableLayoutPanel2.GetColumnWidths()[0];

        var max = Math.Max(width1, width2);

        tableLayoutPanel1.ColumnStyles[0].Width = max;
        tableLayoutPanel1.ColumnStyles[0].SizeType = SizeType.Absolute;
        tableLayoutPanel2.ColumnStyles[0].Width = max;
        tableLayoutPanel2.ColumnStyles[0].SizeType = SizeType.Absolute;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hmm, that's essentially what I was doing originally, but it wasn't working well for me. I just tried it again (copy and pasted your code), and indeed it's fine with only a couple of rows, but with two tables of only 15 rows each, the whole layout process takes almost a second for me, and is very visible. 'Jumping' is more apparent if you give one table long lines and one table short lines. My computer isn't exactly slow (quad-core Phenom II)... is TableLayoutPanel just that inefficient? –  Ashley Nov 13 '11 at 22:14
    
SuspendLayout()/ResumeLayout() on the tables before changing the labels seems to eliminate the jumping behaviour, but it still takes almost a second and is visibly redrawn bit by bit. Perhaps double buffering could take care of the drawing, but not the speed. –  Ashley Nov 13 '11 at 22:19
    
@Ashley - Ahh, that sucks. I was interested because I wondered if WinForms had an equivalent to the WPF feature that makes this task trivial. –  Ritch Melton Nov 14 '11 at 7:39
    
I really, really want to move over to WPF. In my current project I've already created over 80 custom controls, and I think more than 75% of them would've been unnecessary or trivial to implement in WPF. Sadly I'm not familiar enough with the architecture enough at the moment to take the chance. –  Ashley Nov 14 '11 at 18:05
    
Yea, you can do quite a bit with winforms (flowlayout, databinding, presenter seperation), but for easily composting kick-ass controls, WPF rocks.e –  Ritch Melton Nov 14 '11 at 18:12

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